This Week at the Global Math Department

Edited By Casey McCormick @cmmteach
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Online Professional Development Sessions

Rethinking Math Homework
Presented by Frank Wapole and Evan Borkowski
Do you have 100% of your students completing your homework? Are students in your classes routinely using your homework assignments as learning tools? Yes? Then this session is not for you!!! This session is designed to challenge your views on HW, and help you utilize research based HW strategies.

To join this meeting when it starts at 9pm Eastern (or RSVP if it’s before 9pm), click here.

Last week  Cal Armstrong presented the webinar, Learning Math in a Digital Environment. If you missed it, make sure to catch the recording! Don’t forget – recordings for all previously held webinars can be found here.

The #MTBoS Never Sleeps

Desmos Statistics

Desmos just added statistics features to its already amazing free online graphing calculator. Dot plots, box plots, histograms, distributions and t-tests are all now available. This is great news for teachers who teach one variable statistics and data displays.

Bob Lochel created a short video to explain how to use these new features:

And while we’re talking about Desmos, don’t forget that the application for the fourth year of the Desmos fellowship are now open. This amazing professional development opportunity is open to teachers across the US and Canada. If you want to hear more about the fellowship weekend, check out the recent Des-blog featuring past participants experiences.

Written by Erick Lee (@TheErickLee)

Homework: a Problem or a Solution?

Do many of your students struggle to complete math homework?

Recently, Julie Reulbach blogged about Meaningful Homework and CPM. She doesn’t grade homework anymore, but she does check for completion. The CPM curriculum she uses has homework that includes spiral review. Julie has made some purposeful decisions about the quantity and timing of homework where her “students absolutely love the new system.” Read her blog post to learn what steps she took to increase the completion rate and connection to student learning.

Written by Andrew Stadel (@mr_stadel)

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This Week at the Global Math Department

Edited By Nate Goza  @thegozaway
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Online Professional Development Sessions

Learning Math in a Digital Environment

Presented by Cal Armstrong

Learning mathematics for students requires a lot of diverse materials : notes, pictures, graphs, interactives, worksheets, equations, feedback, review materials. How do they have a workflow that works for all these different media; how do they collect, manage and cope while at the same time meeting with accessibility & language needs? And how do teachers manage to deal with all of that along with the need to do assessments, give feedback, observe, reflect and just “teach”? We’ll go through how #digitalink & OneNote have made all of this manageable and has in fact increased learning time in the classroom while adapting to the desire to engage in discussions, #vnps, student voice/choice, visualization and other common practices of the modern classroom.

To join us at 9:00 PM EST for this webinar click here!

GMD is Looking for Presenters!

Do you know someone who you think should lead a GMD Webinar?

Did you see something amazing at a recent conference that needs to be shared?

At Global Math we are proud of our Webinars!  We appreciate all of our presenters and look forward to bringing you the best “PD Iin Your Pajamas” on the internet.  We’re always on the lookout for fresh faces and new ideas.

Please use this recommendation form to let us know who/what should be shared next!  We will take your recommendations and reach out to try to make it happen!

In next week’s webinar Frank Wapole and Evan Borkowski will be here to challenge us to rethink Math homework.  You can get more info on the session and register here.

You can always check out past Global Math Department webinars. Click here for the archives or get the webinars in podcast form!

From the World of Math Ed…

Much Ado About Taxes

In recent weeks, the media has been abuzz with talk of tax rates. Most visible has been the headlines surrounding Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s talk of increasing the top marginal tax rate to 70%. This news has sparked much debate from all sides of the political spectrum. But regardless of your political beliefs, it’s been illuminating to witness the conversations and, in some cases, misunderstandings surrounding the system of income taxation in the United States.

So what’s this got to do with the math ed community? Well, if there was ever a moment for us to shine, this is it!

First up, Dan Meyer has written a blog post with some ideas and resources for helping our students understand marginal taxation. Dan also mentions an amazing collaboration between the New York Times Learning Network and the American Statistical Association called What’s Going on in This Graph? and, even better, Desmos teacher activities that enable teachers to have these conversations through the Desmos platform.

Second, Ben Orlin includes talk of taxes in his critically acclaimed book Math with Bad Drawings. As Ben mentioned on Twitter, the chapter stemmed from a “make your own income tax system” project that he used to give to his precalculus students. He also points out that, interestingly, marginal tax rates are a piecewise-constant function of income while tax paid is a continuous, piecewise linear function.
Third, @voxdotcom came out with a fairly well-made video explaining how tax brackets work. It may be interesting to connect the visual representation of tax brackets as “pockets” with the algebraic concept and notation of piecewise functions. I was particularly impressed by the fact that the video also mentions deductions, a concept often overlooked when people talk about income taxes in the United States.
Ultimately, what’s at stake is not just our students’ mechanical understanding of marginal tax rates. Rather, this is about the aspect of our work as teachers that involves helping our students develop mathematical literacy. In Paulo Freire’s words, before we teach our children to read and write, we must teach them to “read and write the world.” Beyond focusing on high test scores and college acceptances, we must help our students approach the complexities of the world with an array of intellectual tools. We must also help them develop the social and political sensitivities to use those tools with wisdom, agency, and compassion.
Written by Melvin Peralta (@melvinmperalta)
Black History Month, is a time to celebrate and amplify Black voices, stories, shed light on injustices, and teach.  Look at this article Teaching Black History Month from Tolerance.Org for inspiration and lessons.

Click on the image below for some people to follow on Twitter:

Here are some books to read by Black authors;

  1. White Rage by Carol Anderson (Thanks again to Val Brown for leading rich discussions on #ClearTheAir.)
  2. PUSHOUT by Monique W Morris EdD

See Morris’ Retweet with 100 books by Black women authors (image is link):

Finally, if you are teaching about Math History check out Mathematically Gifted and Black.

Contributions compiled by Diana McClean (@teachMcClean)

Number and Space are Inextricably Connected

Try this: close your eyes, and think of an open number line. You just need to picture a line, no intervals marked, just a certain amount of space. That line will have a length, although it is difficult to tell how long your mental image of this line is.

We know this line could stretch from some starting point, to infinity, or rather to some infinite length, which we cannot measure. We could mark an infinite number of points on this line, and actually, we could mark two different types of infinity on this line: counting numbers, and real numbers, which are demonstrably at a higher level on the “tower of infinity”.

But we are getting ahead of ourselves.

Close your eyes, and picture a line of length 10 units. Hold up your hands however long you think that line should be.

Now open them. Where are your hands?

Try the same exercise for 20. Where are your hands?

Here is an interesting tweet thread about some experiences I had working on number lines with grade ones. My colleague asked them to visualize 20.

Consider trying this with your students. Whether “shoulder width” is a preferred human length for number lines is an open question. Perhaps “body scale” is most relatble to us humans.

If you want to blow their minds, ask them to draw an open line of some length, mark 0 and one million as the ends. Where is 1000? Now do the same for one billion. Where is one million?

Space and number are mysteriously connected. As I understand the research, we know they are connected, there is no doubt, we just don’t really know how.

Work is being done in this area. See the pre-print in this tweet below, and consider reading it. Zach Hawes and Daniel Ansari are working on what happens in the brain to connect space and number. Basically, there is an emerging body of evidence that spatial reasoning and thinking about numbers are connected, as shown by fMRI mapping of the regions of the brain responsible for each.

Research continues, seeking to find this “missing link”. In the meantime, an open number line is a tool “with legs” in grade 1-12 education. (Typically, Kindergarten students aren’t quite ready to go past concrete counting objects, ten frames, and on to the number line).

Written by Matthew Oldridge (@MatthewOldridge)

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How Will We Know What They’re Thinking?

How Will We Know What They’re Thinking?

Presented by: Tracy Zager

Curiosity about students’ mathematical thinking is at the heart of effective and joyful mathematics teaching. There are four channels via which we can gather information about student thinking: we can look at student work and products, we can observe and listen to students while they work and talk, we can confer with students about their thinking, and we can ask students to reflect on their own learning and share their self-assessments with us. We’ll explore how to open these four channels strategically, so we can gather better, richer, more interesting information about our students and their thinking, even when using curricular materials that don’t prioritize formative assessment.

Hosted by: Jessica Bogie

Note: Watch the full presentation at: https://www.bigmarker.com/GlobalMathDept/How-Will-We-Know-What-They-re-Thinking

Sign up for the Global Math Department Newsletter at http://globalmathdepartment.org

Presented on June 19, 2018

Building a Statewide Network of Strong Math Leaders

Building a Statewide Network of Strong Math Leaders

Presented by: April Pforts

Are you interested in learning how to leverage existing educational resources? Do you want to know how to use it to build capacity and sustainability? Everything we need to be powerful math leaders is available for free. In Iowa, our statewide math network has grown from essentially 0 to over 3,000 math educators in two short years. By utilizing different technology options, learning options, communities of learning around a targeted interests, knowledge of mathematics and pedagogy, we have grown a statewide network that will be able to continue to build strong math educators for years to come.

Hosted by: Paula Torres

Note: Watch the full presentation at: https://www.bigmarker.com/GlobalMathDept/Building-a-Statewide-Network-of-Strong-Math-Leaders3-2018-06-12-09-00-pm

Sign up for the Global Math Department Newsletter at http://globalmathdepartment.org

Presented on June 12, 2018

Fractions Forever – A Rational Approach (Part 2)

Fractions Forever – A Rational Approach (Part 2)

Presented by: Margie Pligge and Nancy Mueller

Don’t wait until your fraction unit to introduce fraction problems. We will use a framework to explore problems and number choices that help students make sense of fraction operations. Attendees will experience math talks, look at student work, and leave with specific grade level guidelines to teach fractions forever.

Note: The file size for this webinar was two large and has been split into two parts.  This is part 2.

Hosted by: Paula Torres

Note: Watch the full presentation at: https://www.bigmarker.com/GlobalMathDept/Fractions-Forever-A-Rational-Approach

Sign up for the Global Math Department Newsletter at http://globalmathdepartment.org

Presented on January 29, 2019

Fractions Forever – A Rational Approach (Part 1)

Fractions Forever – A Rational Approach

Presented by: Margie Pligge and Nancy Mueller

Don’t wait until your fraction unit to introduce fraction problems. We will use a framework to explore problems and number choices that help students make sense of fraction operations. Attendees will experience math talks, look at student work, and leave with specific grade level guidelines to teach fractions forever.

Note: The file size for this webinar was two large and has been split into two parts.  This is part 1.

Hosted by: Paula Torres

Note: Watch the full presentation at: https://www.bigmarker.com/GlobalMathDept/Fractions-Forever-A-Rational-Approach

Sign up for the Global Math Department Newsletter at http://globalmathdepartment.org

Presented on January 29, 2019

Building a Badging System: Let Your Students See Math In Action (Part 2)

Building a Badging System: Let Your Students See Math In Action (Part 2)

Presented by: Joel Bezaire

7th Grade teacher Joel Bezaire uses a collection of over 125 resources he’s gathered from around the web to let students see how math is used in a variety of contexts outside of a math classroom. In this Global Math session come hear how his system works, see some of the resources, see student work samples, and discuss together the ins-and-outs of making a system like this a success in your own classroom (As seen in 2018’s NCTM MTMS Blog on MyNCTM).

Note: The webinar recording was too large and was split into two files.  This is part 2.

Hosted by: Sheila Orr

Note: Watch the full presentation at: https://www.bigmarker.com/GlobalMathDept/Building-a-Badging-System-Let-Your-Students-See-Math-In-Action

Sign up for the Global Math Department Newsletter at http://globalmathdepartment.org

Presented on January 22, 2019

Building a Badging System: Let Your Students See Math In Action (Part 1)

Building a Badging System: Let Your Students See Math In Action (Part 1)

Presented by: Joel Bezaire

7th Grade teacher Joel Bezaire uses a collection of over 125 resources he’s gathered from around the web to let students see how math is used in a variety of contexts outside of a math classroom. In this Global Math session come hear how his system works, see some of the resources, see student work samples, and discuss together the ins-and-outs of making a system like this a success in your own classroom (As seen in 2018’s NCTM MTMS Blog on MyNCTM).

Note: The webinar recording was too large and was split into two files.  This is part 1.

Hosted by: Sheila Orr

Note: Watch the full presentation at: https://www.bigmarker.com/GlobalMathDept/Building-a-Badging-System-Let-Your-Students-See-Math-In-Action

Sign up for the Global Math Department Newsletter at http://globalmathdepartment.org

Presented on January 22, 2019

This Week at the Global Math Department

Edited By Chase Orton @mathgeek76
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Online Professional Development Sessions

Fractions Forever — A Rational Aproach
Presented by Margie Pligge and Nancy Mueller
Don’t wait until your fraction unit to introduce fraction problems. We will use a framework to explore problems and number choices that help students make sense of fraction operations. Attendees will experience math talks, look at student work, and leave with specific grade level guidelines to teach fractions forever.
To join this meeting tonight when it starts at 9pm Eastern (or RSVP if it’s before 9pm), click here.
Did you miss last week’s webinar? Click here to watch “Building a Badging System: Let Your Students See Math In Action.”

The #MTBoS Never Sleeps

Drop Everything and Math

I saw this tweet from my friend Alecia Ford (@AleciaHiggFord) talking about how Madison Knowe (@knowemath) had a list of questions in her classroom and the last question was “What would the math equivalent of drop everything and read time look like?”

This has been a question on my mind a lot this year as we implemented “silent sustained reading” (SSR) time in my school. I was a little jealous and have been considering ways that we could potentially help students have this same relationship with math. So I posed the question back to Alecia. This was her response:

Then Madison weighed in with the ways she has been trying to incorporate it more in her own classroom with this tweet:

I love the idea of a “math play toolbox” and having games and puzzles as well as math books. And then Joel (@joelbezaire) offered up a newsletter from Kent Haines (@KentHaines) and a few games (Cat Stack and Manifolds) to pick up as a starting point.

How about y’all? What strategies have you tried to be able to have “drop everything and math” time as part of your school day? How do your students respond to this idea?

Amber Thienel
@amberthienel

[Editor’s Note: If you want to read more on the phrase “drop everything and math,” check out this Tracy Zager’s (@TracyZagerpost.]

A New Form of Flashcards

Tired of traditional flashcards? Me too! That’s why I was excited to see Berkeley Everett’s (@BerkeleyEverettMath Flips resource. Rather than having a question on one side and the solution on the other like a traditional flashcard, Math Flips have an exercise on one side and a related exercise example on the other. For example:

Berkeley’s purpose for this is to promote relational understanding rather than answer-getting. I love this progression of questions:

He credits other math educators including Chrissy Newell, who created a number talk with two related problems and the question sequence “How many? How do you know?” and “How many NOW? How do you know?”, Annie Fetter and Joe Schwartz, who say “Ask about ideas, not answers,” and the amazing number sense routines shared by Steve Wyborney (www.stevewyborney.com). He invites YOU to send ideas/feedback to Berkeley (email or Twitter) or make your own.

Berkeley has many downloadable flashcards. Try them out and let us know what you think.

Howie Hua
@howie_hua

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This Week at the Global Math Department

Edited By Casey McCormick @cmmteach
View this email in your browser
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Online Professional Development Sessions

Building a Badging System: Let Your Students See Math In Action
Presented by Joel Bezaire
Seventh Grade teacher Joel Bezaire uses a collection of over 125 resources he’s gathered from around the web to let students see how math is used in a variety of contexts outside of a math classroom. In this Global Math session come hear how his system works, see some of the resources, see student work samples, and discuss together the ins-and-outs of making a system like this a success in your own classroom (As seen in 2018’s NCTM MTMS Blog on MyNCTM).

To join this meeting when it starts at 9pm Eastern (or RSVP if it’s before 9pm), click here.

Last week Shannon Kiebler presented the webinar,  Fostering the Equitable Math Talk Community. If you missed it, make sure to catch the recording! Don’t forget – recordings for all previously held webinars can be found here.

The #MTBoS Never Sleeps

Numberphile and “The Klein Bottle Guy”

I’m positive that many of you are familiar with the videos that Numberphile have produced about mathematics. If you’re not, you should stop their website https://www.numberphile.com/or YouTube channel https://www.youtube.com/user/numberphile to check them out. Here are three of my favourites:

Numberphile is produced by video journalist Brady Haran and features mathematicians describing some really interesting mathematics in an entertaining and easy to understand way. They recently started a podcast, and their newest episode features an interview with the “Klein Bottle Guy” Cliff Stoll, an astronomer, author and educator.

Michael Jacobs tweeted that “This @numberphile podcast with Cliff Stoll is a must listen for any teacher. What struck me is the massive impact (positive or negative) we can have on our students by the way in which we respond to their curious questions.” I couldn’t agree more with Michael. Cliff describes the powerful and profound impact that teachers and mentors in his early years had in shaping his career and educational trajectory. He described tracking down his eighth grade math teacher, fifty some years after being her student, to let her know how thankful he was that she took his questions seriously and fostered his curiosity. Cliff’s stories highlighted for me the important role that teachers have in the lives of their students and how teachers’ words and attitudes have consequences far beyond the walls of their classrooms.

This message is especially poignant this weekend as my Twitter feed is filled with descriptions of students on a school trip to Washington, DC behaving in racist, ignorant and disrespectful ways, seemingly within sight of their teachers. Teachers have an important role in naming, addressing and countering these racist attitudes.

Written by Erick Lee (@TheErickLee)

Once a Teacher, Always a Teacher

When I first entered the world of Twitter, Jenise Sexton was one of my first follows.  I knew of her math contributions as a state curriculum writer, and as a follower of her blog, learned of her impressive career. With only fourteen years in the profession, she has taught at the elementary and middle school levels, been a team leader, and has been in a coaching capacity at the site and district levels. It was evident to me that Jenise is a natural teacher who believes that teaching is at the center of getting better at mathematics, because twice, she chose to leave her coaching position to reenter the classroom to give her more insight.

When I finally met her in person at TMC17 in Atlanta, I was not surprised that she not once spoke of her many accomplishments, contributions, or speaking engagements, but only of the teaching and learning of mathematics, and the elevation of the profession.

Now coaching at the district level, her latest blog is unsurprisingly entitled A Case For Teacher Envy. In it, she speaks of her teachers who are just hitting the ball out of the park for their students. She specifically highlights eighth grade educator @tenaciousXpert, whose photos below give a hint of her practice.

Her room is divided into four quadrants, reinforcing vocabulary, and she methodically creates natural opportunities for students to build their math intuition.

I suspect this educator, like Jenise, sets high expectations of students, often motivating students to continue to work out the math long after class has ceased. I encourage you to read this blog and follow both educators if you haven’t already. Surely, there is much more to come from both.

Written by Marian Dingle (@DingleTeach)

I Don’t Give Two S**** if They are Real-World

Fawn took a Would You Rather math challenge (with context) and created a similar math challenge stripping the context. She then conducted a survey and blogged about it in Jelly Beans or No Jelly Beans.

She surveyed her students, Twitter, and even her own children about which math challenge they’d rather tackle. There’s a 50% chance the results of the survey will surprise you and there’s a 50% chance it won’t surprise you. However, you can be 100% certain Fawn’s choice and reasoning are insightful, entertaining, and heartfelt because she doesn’t “give two shits if they are real-world”. Click here to enjoy Fawn describe the beauty she finds in mathematics.

Written by Andrew Stadel (@mr_stadel)

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