Mathivate…be the best fraction of a kid’s day!! (part 2)

Mathivate…be the best fraction of a kid’s day!! (part 2)

Note: This is part 2 of this podcast.

Presented by: Kim Thomas

M-A-T-H What does it spell? Best subject ever!!  Let’s celebrate KIDS + YOU + MATH!! You will leave this celemathbration with mathtastic learning experiences to implement in your classroom. Be ready to have an amathazing time with projects and activities that are personalized for kids. Mathlicious ideas like Math Muscles, Equationanza, MEflection SymMEtry, Fraction of Your Brain, MathO’ween, Namerea, Christmath Trees, Yahmathzee, and Fracordiddles will put a positive parabola on everyone’s face!! Most of these activities can be adapted to any grade level, but the primary focus are middle school grades – Bring your mathitude to this celemathbration!!

Hosted by: Paula Torres

Note: Watch the full presentation at: https://www.bigmarker.com/GlobalMathDept/Mathivate-be-the-best-fraction-of-a-kid-s-day

Presented on April 30, 2019

Mathivate…be the best fraction of a kid’s day!! (part 1)

Mathivate…be the best fraction of a kid’s day!!

Note: This is part 1 of this podcast.

Presented by: Kim Thomas

M-A-T-H What does it spell? Best subject ever!!  Let’s celebrate KIDS + YOU + MATH!! You will leave this celemathbration with mathtastic learning experiences to implement in your classroom. Be ready to have an amathazing time with projects and activities that are personalized for kids. Mathlicious ideas like Math Muscles, Equationanza, MEflection SymMEtry, Fraction of Your Brain, MathO’ween, Namerea, Christmath Trees, Yahmathzee, and Fracordiddles will put a positive parabola on everyone’s face!! Most of these activities can be adapted to any grade level, but the primary focus are middle school grades – Bring your mathitude to this celemathbration!!

Hosted by: Paula Torres

Note: Watch the full presentation at: https://www.bigmarker.com/GlobalMathDept/Mathivate-be-the-best-fraction-of-a-kid-s-day

Presented on April 30, 2019

Engagement: Just 3 Acts Away

Engagement: Just 3 Acts Away

Presented by: Felicia Casto

What do a majority of math classes lack? Engagement! Come join us for conversations on how to incorporate real world 3 Act Tasks and feel like a true mathematician. Hear from teachers and students how 3 Act Tasks bring joy and excitement to math classes. We will also discuss how to create these engaging three act tasks that are accessible to all learners.

Hosted by: Rana Hafiz

Note: Watch the full presentation at: https://www.bigmarker.com/GlobalMathDept/Engagement-Just-3-Acts-Away

Sign up for the Global Math Department Newsletter at http://globalmathdepartment.org

Presented on April 23, 2019

How to Expose It: Contemporary Mathematics at the High School Level

How to Expose It: Contemporary Mathematics at the High School Level

Presented by: Nitsa Movshovitz-Hadar

This presentation will focus on an R&D project aimed at exposing high school students to contemporary mathematics by periodically sharing with them Math News Snapshots (MNSs). Metaphorically speaking the idea is to take high school students on a glass bottom boat tour over the deep, colorful, vivid, often stormy mathematical ocean, for 45 minutes, once a month or so. The rationale, the definition of MNS, MNSs development, and results of their implementation will be discussed. You may wish to take a few minutes to familiarize yourself with the website (https://mns.co.il)

Hosted by: Leigh Nataro

Note: Watch the full presentation at: https://www.bigmarker.com/GlobalMathDept/How-to-Expose-It-Contemporary-Mathematics-at-the-High-School-Level

Sign up for the Global Math Department Newsletter at http://globalmathdepartment.org

Presented on April 16, 2019

STEM Content Knowledge, Affect, and Identity in the K-16 Classroom

Presented by: Evelyn Laffey

National discourse on science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) urges educators to attend to the growing demand for a STEM-literate populace. But, what is “STEM-literacy,” and how do we, as educators, cultivate opportunities for students to enhance their STEM-literacy, as well as their STEM content knowledge and affect? In this session, I will share action research (conducted at the university and high school levels) that aims to understand the impact of engineering modules on students’ cognition and affect. I will share the framework for STEM-literacy and affect, as well as the data collection tools and analysis methods that can be adapted for use in your classroom.

Hosted by: Leigh Nataro

Note: Watch the full presentation at: https://www.bigmarker.com/GlobalMathDept/Activating-Curiosity-Creativity-in-the-Modern-Mathematics-Classroom

Sign up for the Global Math Department Newsletter at http://globalmathdepartment.org

Presented on April 2, 2019

Activating Curiosity in the Modern Mathematics Classroom (Part 2)

Activating Curiosity in the Modern Mathematics Classroom (Part 2)

Note: This is part 2 of the podcast for this episode.

Presented by: Gerald Aungst

Students enter school bursting with curiosity about the world. To create confident problem solvers, teachers in the modern mathematics classroom must learn to activate and nurture that curiosity, going beyond mere development of skills and rote methods. In this webinar, we will connect the 5 Principles of Conjecture, Communication, Collaboration, Chaos, and Celebration to an understanding of how curiosity works to design a classroom environment that promotes innovation and mathematical thinking.

Hosted by: Leigh Nataro

Note: Watch the full presentation at: https://www.bigmarker.com/GlobalMathDept/Activating-Curiosity-Creativity-in-the-Modern-Mathematics-Classroom

Sign up for the Global Math Department Newsletter at http://globalmathdepartment.org

Presented on March 26, 2019

Activating Curiosity in the Modern Mathematics Classroom (Part 1)

Activating Curiosity in the Modern Mathematics Classroom (Part 1)

Note: This is part 1 of the podcast for this episode.

Presented by: Gerald Aungst

Students enter school bursting with curiosity about the world. To create confident problem solvers, teachers in the modern mathematics classroom must learn to activate and nurture that curiosity, going beyond mere development of skills and rote methods. In this webinar, we will connect the 5 Principles of Conjecture, Communication, Collaboration, Chaos, and Celebration to an understanding of how curiosity works to design a classroom environment that promotes innovation and mathematical thinking.

Hosted by: Leigh Nataro

Note: Watch the full presentation at: https://www.bigmarker.com/GlobalMathDept/Activating-Curiosity-Creativity-in-the-Modern-Mathematics-Classroom

Sign up for the Global Math Department Newsletter at http://globalmathdepartment.org

Presented on March 26, 2019

This Week at the Global Math Department

Edited By Nate Goza  @thegozaway
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Making Fluency Meaningful

Presented by Anne Agostinelli

Have you heard about Math or Number Talks but wonder how to make them meaningful? Let’s explore what makes them effective: the protocol, talk moves, and the many resources from our #MTBoS community, along with ideas for making it all fit into your math classes.

To join us at 9:00 PM EST for this webinar click here!

Next week will be our final webinar (and Newsletter) of this school year!  Join usas Megan Holmstrom and Ryan Grady lead a discussion on how our beliefs impact our identity as math educators.

You can always check out past and upcoming Global Math Department webinars. Click here for the archives or get the webinars in podcast form!

Another School Year Comes to an End…

Ends and New Beginnings

Since this is our team’s last newsletter of the year, I wanted to share two resources that represent a typical teacher end and a typical teacher beginning.

In the End…

There is usually a test. At least, that’s how it is in NYC public schools. My 7th graders – yes, SEVENTH GRADERS – are currently stressed about an end-of-year math exam called the Regents. It’s not a great way to end an otherwise great year of relationship building, inside jokes, and shared tribulations, but it is what it is.

In the spirit of thinking about math exams, please read @howiehua’s piece in Edutopia on A Strategy for Reducing Math Test Anxiety. In sum, it’s based on giving students a chance to have a brief pre-test conversation with the test in hand. He shares an anecdote where one student talks about having pre-test jitters, and the pre-test conversations help calm their insecurities. He also notes that since he and his co-teacher encourage discussion and collaboration in class, it only makes sense to test the way they teach. I can say from personal experience that if you ever implement this strategy in your class, it will be some of the most intense five minutes of mathematical discussion you’ll see.

In the Beginning…

Teachers do new stuff to their classrooms. This year, I put up many of @MrCoreyMath’s mathematician posters in my room. It’s a thoughtful and extensive selection of mathematicians from diverse backgrounds, which I used this year as a first step in a larger campaign to broaden my students’ conceptions of who does mathematics.

In addition, @jocedage recently tweeted a link to STEM role model posters, which were released for International Women’s Day and which are now available in multiple languages. They look amazing!

In Summary…

Thank you to everyone who read our newsletter this year and, of course, to our amazing editor, @thegozaway. I’ve learned so much participating in the GMD this year and look forward to learning even more!

Melvin Peralta (@melvinmperalta)

#BreakRank

It was September of last year when Marian Dingle (@DingleTeach) first brought the Global Math Department Newsletter to my attention and being the exceptional educator she is, she sparked an idea and waited patiently for it to ignite my passion. It wasn’t until seven months later she highlighted my first blog post on my experience as a first-time attendee at NCTM 2019 in San Diego and I started to contribute to the GMD Newsletter.

This is my last post for the school year and I must thank Matthew Oldridge (@MatthewOldridge) for passing the baton and sharing this opportunity with me. I appreciate Nate Goza (@thegozaway) for connecting with me and inviting my thoughts and reflections into this new virtual space.

This week, I am highlighting the #ClearTheAir and #BreakRank chat that Christie Nold (@ChristieNold) and Scott Bayer (@Lyricalswordz) hosted on Wednesday, June 5, 2019 in which they discussed “Racism, whiteness, and burnout in antiracism movements: How white racial justice activists elevate burnout in racial justice activists of color in the United States” by Paul Gorski (@PGorski) and Noura Erakat (@4Noura).

Specifically, I draw your attention to a few sub-threads within this chat and invite you to review them with a focus on how crucial these conversations are to the intentional design of mathematical learning spaces.

Let us start with a sub-thread featuring JoyAnn Boudreau (@MrsBoudreau) in which participants discuss setting norms in professional learning spaces with fellow mathematics educators as well as co-constructing them in mathematics classes with our students. The prevailing topics are presuming positive intention, tone policing, a right way to do things, and individual personality traits that hinder our work.

Alice Jane Grimm (@Alice_J_Grimm) beautifully articulated a brief sub-thread about mandatory gender pronoun introductions that I have bookmarked so I may return to it again when next I plan professional learning for colleagues or classroom introductions for students.

Alecia Ford (@AleciaHiggFord) shared a brain break game she has used successfully with her students that creates space to talk openly about race and identity while developing fluency with fractions.

Some of us are settling into summer break routines and slowly shedding layers of this school year’s experiences and others of us are preparing to wrap up the school year with a final perseverance. Let our reflections and forward planning include how we intentionally establish psychological safety for students and colleagues to be and learn in mathematical spaces. Let the goal be to thrive not just survive. (Shout out to Bettina Love.)

As Val Brown (@ValeriaBrownEdu) stated at a Teaching Tolerance workshop in February,  “This is your homework. For the rest of your life.”

Thank you for reading and engaging,

Hema Khodai (@HKhodai)

Summer Time!

This can be a time of joy for teachers to take a much needed break, to rejuvenate, and gather new ideas for next year.  For our students, it can be stressful without the routine of seeing friends, having a safe space with caring adults on the daily. Therefore I offer you a nationwide resource to share with students and families (Thank you @edcampOSjr for sharing)

As we reflect on what worked throughout the year, I plan to be more intentional about building and maintaining relationships with and among my students; I was drawn to the thread started by @EmilyAnderle about morning meetings.  This is a strategy often used in my own child’s 1st grade classroom; I am certain with intentional use in a secondary classroom could be a positive change.

Finally, as we set to start the cycle again (not literally an infinite loop) I was pleased to learn some mathematical content knowledge started on this thread:

Hopefully, we all get a chance to relax (for those still in the classroom I wish you the best).  It has been a pleasure sharing my twitter treasure hunts with the Global Math Department audience.  I have met many virtual and IRL friends.  Thanks @thegozaway for inviting me into this space.

Diana McClean (@teachMcClean)

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This Week at the Global Math Department

Edited By Chase Orton @mathgeek76
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Online Professional Development Sessions

Jump-start Number Sense and Reasoning in 10 Minutes
Presented by John SanGiovanni
Do your students struggle with reasoning about numbers? Are they challenged to think about the reasonableness of their solutions? Are you looking for practical, high-quality tasks to engage students and ignite discussion? In this session, participants learn about dynamic, doable activities engage students in reasoning and discussion. A collection of ready-for-use resources will be provided and explored so that pursuit of number sense becomes a daily routine. These resources naturally complement each and every lesson in any K-2, 3-5, or 6-8 mathematics class regardless of the “core” program.

To join this meeting tonight when it starts at 9pm Eastern (or RSVP if it’s before 9pm), click here.

Last week, Ranjani Krishnan presented “Teacher Cloning.” If you missed it, you can catch the recording here.

The #MTBoS Never Sleeps

In Preparation for Next Year

While the end of the school year is a time to reflect, I’m also inspired by the potential of the next school year. In particular, I have been thinking about how I might develop students’ identities as mathematicians and how this relates to their futures.

“I’m preparing you for college” is a phrase Patricia Vandenberg (@VbergMath) confessed she would use to defend some of her class policies. In a tweet, she asked math professors to share what they’d truly like to see in their math students.

Responses varied, but some common themes were (1) teach students how to take ownership of their learning through organization and engagement, (2) encourage students to take risks and embrace ambiguity, and (3) instead of using this phrase, meet students where they are.

Christelle Rocha
@Maestra_Rocha

Year-end Survey Options

If you are looking for some ideas for a year-end survey, Deidre O’Connor (@historywithmsoc) posted this tweet and has a thread loaded with great suggestions that are general enough for any subject and any grade level.

By Amber Thienel
@amberthienel

Notes from an Inspired Editor
Adding to the suggestions of the authors above, Matt Vaudrey has written quite a bit about Teacher Report Cards. It’s brilliant stuff and a wonderful way to build culture at the beginning, middle, and end of the year. How would your classroom culture changed if you considered doing a Teacher Report Card after the first month of school? Would your students open up more? Would the autonomy and authority shift in the classroom?

Here are onetwo, and three short (less than 5 minute reads) blog posts from Matt’s site. Dive in! And let us know what you think.

Chase Orton

GMD is Looking for Presenters!

Do you know someone who you think should lead a GMD Webinar?

Did you see something amazing at a recent conference that needs to be shared?

At Global Math we are proud of our Webinars!  We appreciate all of our presenters and look forward to bringing you the best “PD Iin Your Pajamas” on the internet.  We’re always on the lookout for fresh faces and new ideas.

Please use this recommendation form to let us know who/what should be shared next!  We will take your recommendations and reach out to try to make it happen!

Stay nerdy my friends! Got something you think should go into the GMD Newsletter, hit me up on Twitter at @mathgeek76.

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This Week at the Global Math Department

Edited By Casey McCormick @cmmteach
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Teacher Cloning
Presented by:  Ranjani Krishnan
I am not enough’ is the feeling I used to get everyday after each class and each day’s work. I wish I could clone myself and spread myself around the classroom so I can meet the needs of every student. Luckily, an online program named Gauss Academy Webwork came to my rescue. With this tool students work online on challenging problems, get instant feedback, engage in a risk-free yet productive struggle, while, I, the teacher can interact with students meaningfully by conducting discussions at the white board with these students about these problems. I have also been cutting my class sizes in half, so to speak, by setting different groups of students into different zones of productivity. One group would work on video note-taking, while the other would work on Gauss Academy Webwork. I redefined video instruction for my classes. After completing video note-taking, students would show me their notes, answer the inquiries posed in the videos, summarize notes, and then debrief with a classmate. I wouldn’t call my video note-taking model “flipping” the classroom, however. I am excited to say that with these two “cloning” tools, I am able to bring face-to-face conversation with students back!

To join this meeting when it starts at 9pm Eastern (or RSVP if it’s before 9pm), click here.

Last week, Kateri Thunder presented ” Math Buddies: Effective Peer Tutoring.” If you missed it, you can catch the recording here.

The #MTBoS Never Sleeps

#MathPhoto19

The Math Photo Challenge is a series of 10 weekly photo prompts posted to Twitter. Each week, participants take photos inspired by that week’s prompt and then share them on Twitter using the hashtag #MathPhoto19. This challenge is a fun way to interact with other #MTBoS teachers and to practice viewing the world through a mathematical lens. Anyone can check out the collection of photos on Twitter by searching the hashtag #MathPhoto19 or at the website https://mathphoto19.wordpress.com/ organized by Carl Oliver. This year’s photo challenge will start on Thursday, June 13th. Anyone can join in at any time.

This is the fifth year of the Math Photo Challenge. The first year was organized by Malke Rosenfeld with assistance and contributions from numerous members of the #MTBoS. It was initially called the Summer Math Photo Challenge. Following years dropped “Summer” from the name in recognition of all the participants from the Southern Hemisphere for whom Summer is still a long way off.

The first week’s challenge will be the number #five to celebrate the fifth year of this annual challenge. Check it out!

Written by Erick Lee (@TheErickLee)

I’m Not A Game of Thrones Guy

I could give a rip about Game of Thrones. I’m one of the few people who has never watched a single episode. I’m not living under a rock. I do know it is popular (or was) and there are some really passionate fans.

One of my favorite feeds is Cool Infographics and they recently posted Visualizing how Fans Rated the Last Season of Game of Thrones.

First, I appreciate how the post included fan ratings of the last season of other shows. Secondly, I love the visual math landscape of all the infographics. Thirdly, a question I have is what does this say about us as consumers of television? Do we rate something poorly when it’s not what we “expected”? I don’t know. Lastly, I appreciate how the author, Randy Krum, expresses his hesitation about one of the axes. Krum says,

My only hesitation with the choices they made when designing these charts is the y-axis. I appreciate that they kept the scale consistent throughout all of the charts in the article, but the non-zero baseline starting at 4.5 is an odd choice. Non-zero baselines are generally a poor design practice, and can mislead viewers that aren’t paying close attention. It looks like using a non-zero baseline was chosen to maximize the visible differences between the ratings, but on a 0-10 scale, it wouldn’t have been much different with a true zero-baseline.

Krum is using a few of the Standards of Mathematical Practice. Can you identify which ones?

Just like I’m not a Game of Thrones guy, I wonder if we asked Krum about his math experience and if he would say, “I’m not a math guy.” I would beg to differ. My challenge to you all is to question anyone who says, “I’m not a math person.” Rubbish. Don’t let them off the hook. Find out why they said that and join the conversation Tisha Jones and I have been having.

Written by Andrew Stadel (@mr_stadel)

Diversity With Intentionality

If you haven’t already seen this tweet from Kristopher Childs, it sparked an interesting conversation this week. And after reading the inaugural blog post from Makeda Brome, I think they both pair well together. Her post, entitled Diversity with Intentionality begins with this line:

“Yes, this is another post about diversity in mathematics.”

She writes about how such goals as diversity and equity can not be achieved haphazardly, but rather with deliberate intent. She uses her recent NCTM experience as an example of how she intentionally sought the conference experience that fulfilled her. I won’t give any more away, but it should be read.

Back to the above discussion, among the pros, there was the power of articulating the importance of diversity and inclusion in math. Among the cons, there was the potential harm of these practices being seen as separate add-ons instead of naturally embedded practices. I keep thinking about intention. How can this type of intentionality be ensured?

The topic of this week’s #ICTM chat was SEL and its relation to mathematical identity hosted by Tyrone Martinez-Black. This was one of the thoughtful questions asked:

The first two statements highlight the importance of identity and agency. It connects to the next image of recent Brandeis mathematics graduate @Algebrandis, as she wears her identity and agency, and intends
to continue to pursue her doctorate.

Written by Marian Dingle (@DingleTeach)

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