Rich math tasks & 5 practices in online teaching – 5/5/20

Rich math tasks & 5 practices in online teaching

Presented by: Theresa Wills

Presented on: May 5, 2020

Explore strategies to implement rich mathematical tasks and discussions in your synchronous online classroom. In this webinar, you will engage in interactive slides to complete a task. You will incorporate multiple representations such as using concrete, pictorial, and abstract. Then, all participants will engage in a math talk that utilizes the 5 practices. Register to see how to transition your pedagogical practices into the online environment and keep your math class fun, interactive, collaborative, and rigorous.

Recommended Grade Level: K-Alg 2

Hosted by: Leigh Nataro

Watch the full presentation at: https://www.bigmarker.com/GlobalMathDept/Rich-Math-Tasks-5-Practices-in-Online-Teaching

NOTE: It is probably better to watch the presentation than to listen to the podcast for this episode. There was a gap where people watched a video without sound and commented in the chat and this is a tech heavy session.

Utilizing Math History to Embrace Equity, Failure, and Authentic Problem Solving in Leadership Communities – 4/28/20

Utilizing Math History to Embrace Equity, Failure, and Authentic Problem Solving in Leadership Communities

Presented by: Sunil Singh

Presented on: April 28, 2020

In order to move forward in math education with clarity, conviction, and passion for equity, we need to have a broader lens. Specifically, one that looks back at our past and the multitude of interwoven stories from thousands of years of global contributions. The thematic development of mathematics, with all of its historic struggles, human resilience, and collective journeys, must be braided into our equity goals and mandates for the math leaders of today and tomorrow.

Recommended Grade Level: K-12

Hosted by: Rana Hafiz

Watch the full presentation at: https://www.bigmarker.com/GlobalMathDept/Utilizing-Math-History-to-Embrace-Equity-Failure-and-Authentic-Problem-Solving-in-Leadership-Communities

This Week at Global Math – 5/19/20







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Edited By Casey McCormick  @cmmteach

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Online Professional Development Sessions

Tonight!

Deliberate Practice: How Math Teachers Can Close the Professional Development Gap

Presented by Chase Orton

I have a confession—math class isn’t working for some of my students. Despite my best efforts, I continue to struggle to meet the myriad of social, emotional, and academic needs of all my students while also moving learning forward for the whole class. Maybe you or someone you work with is also facing this same challenge. Maybe math class isn’t working for some of your students too. If so, please know it’s not your fault. Math teaching is a difficult and complex task, and I know we all want to get better at it. But to get better, we need to close the gap between the PD we’re offered and the PD we need. In this webinar, I will share my thoughts on what’s wrong about our current approaches to PD while also offering you a pathway for a more coherent, teacher-centered approach to your professional learning as a math teacher. While teachers of mathematics are the intended audience, this webinar has value for any educator vested in improving the quality of teaching in the math classroom.

To join us at 9:00 PM EST for this webinar click here!

Next Week 


Attending to Equity in Mathematics During a Pandemic: Supporting Inclusion, Access, Fairness and Respect for All

Presented by: Ruthmae Sears and Caree Pinder

This presentation will describe means to attend to equity in the era of a pandemic. We will describe factors that can impact equitable learning outcomes, and identify strategies that can address equity when teaching remotely.

Register for the webinar here, and join us next week!

You can always check out past and upcoming Global Math Department webinars. Click here for the archives or get the webinars in podcast form!

From the World of Math Ed

 

Laughable Graphs

This week, the state of Georgia shared the following graph as evidence for why it reopened the state for “normal business operations”. 



What do you notice? What do you wonder? What’s the story this graph is supposed to tell?

 

What you might notice is that the dates along the x-axis come in no particular order. You may wonder if the story being this graph is to lead viewers to believing the state has had a significant decrease in the number of COVID-19 cases over time. The governor has since issued an apology addressing the misinformation the graph represents. Can you believe it? A mathematical misrepresentation generated an apology! This is big news. 



When I first viewed this graph on Twitter, I could not help but laugh at the captions. Not a maniacal laugh. Not a “haha that’s so funny” graph. No…this kind: 

The kind that recognizes that these graphs are used to make real decisions that impact real people. 

Bob Lochel (@bobloch) shared the balanced sentiment of the joy of having new content to talk through with students and the sunken pit of the stomach feeling that the new content even exists.  Same, Bob. Same. 

So I culled together several laughable graphs (jokes on you, it’s not that funny) that have been used in real situations. For each one, I suggest asking yourself the same three questions as before: 



What do you notice? What do you wonder? What’s the story this graph is supposed to tell?



I’d also invite you to ask yourself one more question: What’s the real story? 



With all the (mis)information being passed around right now, it is important to find sources for data that describe the real story, what is actually happening, rather than the fictional world we wish we had. 

 

 

 

 


 

Oh. Wait. That last one is just the story of my own life right now, and I’m sure the same for some of you as well. Solidarity, friends. 

 

Remotely Yours, 



Lauren Baucom

@LBMathemagician

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This Week at Global Math – 5/12/2020







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Edited By Chase Orton  @mathgeek76

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Online Professional Development Sessions

Tonight!

Making (Math) Thinking Visible: Embracing Edtech to Help Students Demonstrate Understandings

Presented by Stacey Roshan

This session will examine specific examples using Pear Deck, Flipgrid, and Sutori. Participants will learn how to create student-paced Pear Deck activities with embedded Flipgrid prompts to create exercises that allow students to reflect on how they are understanding the new information they are receiving. At the conclusion of the Pear Deck activity, teachers can use Pear Deck Takeaways to have students revise errors and talk about how their understanding of the topic has improved to help them arrive at a new solution to the problem. Having students evaluate how they approached problems done in the past is an important component of the learning process. By actively reflecting on what they learned and how they learned it, students are able to grow their understandings beyond rote memorization. And in the reflection process, students become aware of holes in their knowledge. This awareness is a powerful component in helping students learn how to learn.

Sutori is another edtech tool that will be showcased in this session. Participants will be walked through an activity asking students to look back on past work and document how it relates to their new knowledge. Reflection is key to learning, and this project provides students the opportunity to tap into prior knowledge and form a deeper understanding of connections between the chapters being studied. As with the Pear Deck activity, Flipgrid is infused into this activity to allow students the opportunity to talk out their thought process directly to their webcam.

To join us at 9:00 PM EST for this webinar click here!

Next Week!

Deliberate Practice:
How Math Teachers Can Close the Professional Development Gap

Presented by Chase Orton

I have a confession—math class isn’t working for some of my students. Despite my best efforts, I continue to struggle to meet the myriad of social, emotional, and academic needs of all my students while also moving learning forward for the whole class. Maybe you or someone you work with is also facing this same challenge. Maybe math class isn’t working for some of your students too. If so, please know it’s not your fault. Math teaching is a difficult and complex task, and I know we all want to get better at it. But to get better, we need to close the gap between the PD we’re offered and the PD we need. In this webinar, I will share my thoughts on what’s wrong about our current approaches to PD while also offering you a pathway for a more coherent, teacher-centered approach to your professional learning as a math teacher. While teachers of mathematics are the intended audience, this webinar has value for any educator vested in improving the quality of teaching in the math classroom.
 

Register ahead of time by clicking here!

You can always check out past and upcoming Global Math Department webinars. Click here for the archives or get the webinars in podcast form!

From the World of Math Ed

“Disaster Distance Learning”: 5 Items After 2 Months

[The term “disaster distance learning” is from a blog post by @TheJLV.]

Before getting into this week’s updates, one GMD note from me: The Global Math Department has allowed me to manage their twitter account. I’ve been trying to use it more actively, and will appreciate any and all feedback from anyone willing to give it! What would you like to see more or less of as the school year comes to an end and over the summer vacation (as applicable)? There is some really great content in our newsletters and webinars, and I am hoping GMD can be a source of information that helps rather than overloads. 🙏

This contribution contains 5 items; please read in accordance with your bandwidth. I’m listing the 5 items before their respective tweets.

1) Virtual Advisory: Zoom-based morning Advisory/Homeroom from Sam J Shah;
2) Where are the educators?: Chalkbeat on NY Governor Cuomo ‘Reimagine Education’ Council;
3) Blaming Teachers?: Brian Robinson unpacks a thread from Nikole Hannah-Jones;
4) Preprint: Cathery Yeh and Laurie Rubel (2020) “Queering Mathematics: Disrupting Binary Oppositions in Mathematics Pre-service Teacher Education”;
5) #31DaysIBPOC: I strongly recommend a piece by fellow GMD contributor Hema Khodai.

Tweet and Blog Post:

Tweet and Link:

Quote-Retweet Commentary and Original Tweet (a bit of a rabbit hole):

Tweet and Preprint (quick read if you have it in you!):

Tweet and #31DaysIBPOC Contribution:

A closing word from Audre Lorde: “Caring for myself is not self-indulgence, it is self-preservation, and that is an act of political warfare.”

I know that we will Move Beyond (whatever that means) the present conditions; but, we need caring educators to preserve themselves. Please do not neglect self-care!

Benjamin Dickman [@benjamindickman]

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This Week at Global Math – 5/5/2020







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Edited By Nate Goza  @thegozaway

View this email in your browser

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Online Professional Development Sessions

Tonight!

Rich Math Tasks & 5 Practices in Online Teaching

Presented by Theresa Wills

Explore strategies to implement rich mathematical tasks and discussions in your synchronous online classroom. In this webinar, you will engage in interactive slides to complete a task. You will incorporate multiple representations such as using concrete, pictorial, and abstract. Then, all participants will engage in a math talk that utilizes the 5 practices. Register to see how to transition your pedagogical practices into the online environment and keep your math class fun, interactive, collaborative, and rigorous.

To join us at 9:00 PM EST for this webinar click here!

Next Week 

Making (Math) Thinking Visible: Embracing Edtech to Help Students Demonstrate Understandings

Presented by Stacey Roshan

This session will examine specific examples using Pear Deck, Flipgrid, and Sutori. Participants will learn how to create student-paced Pear Deck activities with embedded Flipgrid prompts to create exercises that allow students to reflect on how they are understanding the new information they are receiving. At the conclusion of the Pear Deck activity, teachers can use Pear Deck Takeaways to have students revise errors and talk about how their understanding of the topic has improved to help them arrive at a new solution to the problem. Having students evaluate how they approached problems done in the past is an important component of the learning process. By actively reflecting on what they learned and how they learned it, students are able to grow their understandings beyond rote memorization. And in the reflection process, students become aware of holes in their knowledge. This awareness is a powerful component in helping students learn how to learn.

Sutori is another edtech tool that will be showcased in this session. Participants will be walked through an activity asking students to look back on past work and document how it relates to their new knowledge. Reflection is key to learning, and this project provides students the opportunity to tap into prior knowledge and form a deeper understanding of connections between the chapters being studied. As with the Pear Deck activity, Flipgrid is infused into this activity to allow students the opportunity to talk out their thought process directly to their webcam.

Register ahead of time by clicking here!

You can always check out past and upcoming Global Math Department webinars. Click here for the archives or get the webinars in podcast form!

From the World of Math Ed

Shared with permission from Bean, this is a different kind of article written for the GMD Newsletter…
 

I love grappling with everything related to mathematics education. I dream about it in all of its puzzling, perplexing, and messy glory and shortcomings. It preoccupies my every weekday-thought; who am I kidding, it also seeps into all of my weekend thoughts. 
 
So it breaks my heart every time Bean and I sit down to do math homework and my little one cries out with frustration. This little kid, who for years has been my eager partner in #tmwyk, now dissolves into tears every time we log in to Google Classroom. I’m serious. She’s a puddle on the floor at my feet. My arms cannot begin to gather the viscous pool of disengagement and defiance spreading across the carpet at my feet. (@MathStudio_Usha says she is “her Mother’s Daughter”.) I can’t help but feel like an abysmal failure both as an educator and a mother that the love I have for learning and the joy I experience when mucking about with mathematics isn’t shared by my only child. 
 
We sit in seething resentment, my mind spinning with all the strategies that I would normally try and wondering if I should in turn threaten, cajole, punish, surrender, my mini me into getting the worksheets done so I can feel better about it. 
 
“Mama, I want to show you the Coronavirus tracker.”
 
I’m still angry and don’t give a sh_t about the tracker of this stupid disease that’s ruining my life. (See how in the midst of a global pandemic, we continue to center ourselves?)
 
She goes on to show me anyways; comparing the total confirmed cases in Canada to the total confirmed cases globally. (By the end of Grade 4, she only needs to be able to read, represent, compare, and order whole numbers to 10000.)

She reads, describes, and interprets the secondary data presented in this image, pausing to pose purposeful questions to ensure I understand the magnitude of the information she’s sharing.


 

She effortlessly toggles back and forth between the chart view and the table view in the section below, carefully reviewing the labels on the axes while drawing conclusions from the comparisons between provinces.


 

It took me longer than I care to admit to really hear the depth of understanding my daughter has developed for herself; the complex data she has unpacked and was now offering to me as an olive branch. A glimpse into the learning she was choosing to engage in and generously inviting me to enter.
 
I have no profound words of wisdom, no wonder-filled revelation about humanity. This is simply a story that I wanted to share. An experience that gave me some comfort. A reminder that we don’t need to force learning because children (and grown-ups) will learn about things that interest them when they are ready.

@HKhodai

Wealth, Shown to Scale

Megan Bang (@meganbang3), an education professor who has written incredible articles on indigenous STEM practices (among other work), shared this website of wealth inequality, shown to scale. The authorship is not clearly indicated, but the website is hosted through Matt Korostoff’s github account, so he may be its creator. Scroll through everything. It takes time. But then again, that may be the point.

mathartchallenge

This has been covered already in the GMD, but it’s worth plugging yet another reminder that #mathartchallenge continues, thanks to the incredible work of Annie Perkins (@anniek_p) and everyone else who has been creating math art from their homes and other spaces.

Math Summer 2020

Howie Hua (@howie_hua) is organizing two hour-long sessions of low-floor, high-ceiling problems every Wednesday from 10am to 12pm (PDT) from June through August. If you would like to host a problem, please sign up in the google doc.


 

On a separate note, Howie has been killing it in the math twitter humor department recently. You can find a repository of some past tweets that have been well-received. For some, a little bit of humor can go a long way to help through these rough times.

@melvinmperalta

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This Week at Global Math – 4/28/20







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Edited By Casey McCormick  @cmmteach

View this email in your browser

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Online Professional Development Sessions

Tonight!

Utilizing Math History to Embrace Equity, Failure, and Authentic Problem Solving

in Leadership Communities


Presented by 

 

Sunil Singh

In order to move forward in math education with clarity, conviction, and passion for equity, we need to have a broader lens. Specifically, one that looks back at our past and the multitude of interwoven stories from thousands of years of global contributions. The thematic development of mathematics, with all of its historic struggles, human resilience, and collective journeys, must be braided into our equity goals and mandates for the math leaders of today and tomorrow.

To join us at 9:00 PM EST for this webinar click here!

Next Week 


Rich Math Tasks & 5 Practices in Online Teaching

Presented by: 

Theresa Wills

Explore strategies to implement rich mathematical tasks and discussions in your synchronous online classroom. In this webinar, you will engage in interactive slides to complete a task. You will incorporate multiple representations such as using concrete, pictorial, and abstract. Then, all participants will engage in a math talk that utilizes the 5 practices. Register to see how to transition your pedagogical practices into the online environment and keep your math class fun, interactive, collaborative, and rigorous.

Register for the webinar here, and join us next week!

You can always check out past and upcoming Global Math Department webinars. Click here for the archives or get the webinars in podcast form!

From the World of Math Ed

Happy Hunger Games: AP Edition

There have been some amazing responses of how parents, teachers, schools, and businesses have come together across the last couple weeks to solve the problems that have arisen amidst the coronavirus pandemic.  There have also been some pretty poor responses. One such response is that from the College Board in how they are handing AP Exams for students this year, enacting a literal Hunger Games in which the system is heavily exposed, and the people who lose are those who are forced to play. 


 

With all of the noise pointed at the coronavirus, there is little collective attention or organization from teacher groups to discuss these issues openly and to disrupt the injustices that are occurring. You may not have seen this, but a group of AP teachers came together to write an open letter to the College Board to address the inequities that their current solution presents. The exam, which is normally 2-3 hours, is now only 45 minutes; students without devices are being told to use smartphones, while students with desktops will be able to print questions out. The exam is only open for a small window across the world, meaning some students will take the exam at midnight, while others will take the exam at noon. Why is it that this inequitable injustice is the best solution that College Board has come up with in order to “award” students college credit for courses they take “early” during high school? And what do they think the scores will look like when they return, when students from more affluent communities achieve higher scores, not because of better instruction or more content knowledge, but because they had a printer and a large screen computer? Will students who score 5s feel as though they have accomplished something as compared to their 1 scoring peers?

 

Students in AP courses are being told that “this is the best we can do for you”, and many are naively going to try to do their best on a test that will measure little but privilege and wealth, believing that not doing so will somehow keep them from succeeding in the colleges to which they’ve already been accepted. 

 

As others have said about many of the systems we have used in education simply because of tradition, it is time to question whether the system of Advanced Placement seeks to serve students or the system of capitalism so that the for-profit company of College Board can continue to earn a dollar on the backs of teachers and students worldwide. Instead of banding teachers together right now in the name of learning, the have pitted students and teachers against one another in a game they will name as grit and sacrifice for the sake of tradition. 

The system of AP courses has always struggled with inequity as the populations of students in the courses almost never reflect the population of the community around it, making the courses a system of elitism for the dominant population to believe their students are “ahead” of other groups simply by gaining entry to the class (Just go check out your school’s OCR data to see how y’all are doing) . By no means am I here to judge any teacher who is still trying to “make it work” for the students enrolled in their class, trying to make the best of what you have been told you must do to “help your students”. May you come to realize, though, that in doing so, without speaking up about what is occurring, about what we know is wrong, you are just a pawn in the game they are playing. 

 

 

In continuing to pretend to go on as normal, you normalize their behavior as acceptable and send the message to your students that “this is just the way things work here.” It is in times when we know an injustice is occurring and we choose to be silent that we continue to let these systems, run on tradition, prevail.

 

To those AP teachers whose students are testing these next few weeks, may you find space to name these injustices and ways to dismantle the system. May you join together to dream a new dream of what these learning spaces could be. Lest we “go back to normal” and pretend to not know what game we are really playing. 

 

 

 

Masked Solidarity,

Lauren Baucom

@LBMathemagician

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Creating an Inclusive Environment Using Project Based Learning in Middle School Mathematics – 4/21/20

Creating an Inclusive Environment Using Project Based Learning in Middle School Mathematics

Presented by: Rhonda Hewer

Presented on: April 21, 2020

Is there a way for students to engage in the mathematics outlined in the curriculum in a relevant, practical way that will improve understanding and retention? Answer: YES! In this webinar the audience will be exposed to the components of a quality project based learning program in math through the narrative of the geodesic dome project. It will be evident how this type of “instruction” supports diverse cultural and learning needs of the classroom while digging into rich mathematical thinking at a level appropriate for all learners. The project involves multiple strands from the mathematics curriculum while developing global competencies of collaboration, communication, creativity, critical thinking and citizenship. Register now to hear how this group of grade 8 students developed a strong understanding of math by using their toolbox of strategies to solve practical problems for an authentic audience.

Recommended Grade Level: 6-8

Hosted by: Leigh Nataro

Watch the full presentation at: https://www.bigmarker.com/GlobalMathDept/Creating-an-Inclusive-Environment-Using-Project-Based-Learning-in-Middle-School-Mathematics

 

The Power of Words – 4/14/20

The Power of Words

Presented by: Diana McClean, Sam Kaplan

Presented on: April 14, 2020

Evaluating our word choice can help change our thinking. Overtime we (educators) have become numb to the powerful student facing descriptors that when used haphazardly can define student identity. This talk will put forward ideas to think deeply about ways we can shift our language to improve student identities.

Recommended for: All Teachers and Administrators

Hosted by: Leigh Nataro

Watch the full presentation at: https://www.bigmarker.com/GlobalMathDept/The-Power-of-Words

 

Six (Un)Productive Practices in Mathematics Teaching – 4/7/20

Six (Un)Productive Practices in Mathematics Teaching

Presented by: Juli K. Dixon

Presented on: April 7, 2020

Juli Dixon reveals six ways we undermine efforts to increase student achievement and then she goes on to share what to do about them. These teaching practices are commonplace and often required by administrators. Many of them may have been generated from practices in English language arts (ELA) and might work very well in that content area. As a result of this session, you will understand that they are often unproductive when applied during mathematics instruction and may even lead to issues of access and equity. This session helps you to see why these practices are unproductive and also assists you in generating a plan for what to do about them. Participants will: · Make sense of six (un)productive mathematics teaching practices; · Explore reasons for why the practices exist; and · Learn productive strategies to counteract the madness ☺.

Recommended Grade Level: K-12

Hosted by: Leigh Nataro

Watch the full presentation at:https://www.bigmarker.com/GlobalMathDept/Six-Un-Productive-Practices-in-Mathematics-Teaching

 

Supporting Math from Outside the Classroom – 3/31/20

Supporting Math from Outside the Classroom

Presented by: Matt Vaudrey

Presented on: March 31, 2020

We’re responsible for the math learning of all students, even when Math Education isn’t our daily practice anymore. As a math teacher, then instructional coach and consultant, then an administrator, Matt Vaudrey has gathered some insights. In a quick hour, we’ll: –Offer math teachers sentence frames to demand the support they need (while being open to needs they might not notice) –Offer coaches some practices (and case studies) to support math education when you don’t have any skin in the game. –Translate some values, so teachers and teacher-leaders can both speak a common language as we improve math education for all students. Includes lifetime support, puns, and probably a Britney Spears reference.

Recommended for: Leaders/ Coaches/ Administrators

Hosted by: Sheila Orr

Watch the full presentation at:https://www.bigmarker.com/GlobalMathDept/Supporting-Math-from-Outside-the-Classroom