Starting School or Still Summering?







Starting School or Still Summering?



Edited By Meg Craig @mathymeg07

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Flipping Your Math Classroom: More Than Just Videos and Worksheets
Presented by Crystal Kirch (@crystalkirch)

The flipped classroom is not just about watching videos at home – it’s about getting time back in your classroom to deepen the learning experience for students. Flipping transformed my high school math classroom into one with more student-centered active learning and higher-order thinking activities that allowed my students to take ownership of their learning and communicate mathematically in ways I could never do before. Come and learn how to truly define an effective flipped classroom and gather ideas for the five questions every flipped classroom teacher must answer. Whether you are already flipping, intrigued by the idea, or a current naysayer of flipping, I look forward to sharing my experiences with you and providing you the resources to begin your flipping journey. Recommended for teachers grades 4 and up.

To join the meeting when it starts at 9pm Eastern (or RSVP if it’s before 9pm), click here.

Last week Jessica Bogie, Regan Galvan, and Sarah DiMaria shared ideas for Back to School Night.

Check out the recording here.

Getting back into the swing of things…

PD that doesn’t suck

If you’re looking for some awesome professional development that builds a community culture, then Brian Bushart and Regina Payne got your back.  

In its second year of implementation the Math Rocks Cohort are back at it again as they look harness the power of the MTBoS within their district.  Your can read Brian’s reflections here and here.

From creating blogs and Twitter accounts, to exploring Estimation180 and Which One Doesn’t Belong, right down to the implementation of Number Talks, the teachers of Round Rock ISD will be ready to hit the ground running when class fires back up.

Written by Graham Fletcher (@gfletchy)

#MTBoSBlaugust Rolls On

August is halfway done but plenty of great bloggers are far from finished with their contributions to this month’s writing challenge. Mark Chubb described how finishing the lesson well can provide new learning opportunities in the post Never Skip the Closing Of The Lesson. In this post Mark uses a Marilyn Burns problem (pictured above) to highlight 3 different steps of closing a lesson well. He goes on to provide more information, driving home the point that “Closing a lesson takes time, but skipping the close is the biggest waste of time!”

Over at Math Equals Love, Sarah describes the group game “Guess My Rule.” After reading Elizabeth Cohen’s Designing Groupwork: Strategies for the Heterogeneous Classroom, Sarah was inspired to create this game and to implement it alongside two other games in the first week of school. To learn more, check out the post Guess My Rule.

Lastly, Casey has essentially turned her blog into an acrostic poem. Her latest post focuses on the letter E and has focused on the environment of her classroom. Check out the post to see pictures of her classroom including her “#MTBoS Wall.”

Written by Carl Oliver (@carloliwitter)

Join in the Fun!

It’s not too late to start participating in #MTBoSBlaugust ((MTBoS + Blog + August). The only challenge is to blog more than you normally would–whether that’s one post a week or one post a day!  Sign up and find some great prompts here!

If a blog post seems like too much (due to end-of-summer-laziness or back-to-school-craziness), you can still contribute by writing some encouraging comments on the participating blogs or tweeting out some of your favorite posts! 

Written by Meg Craig (@mathymeg07)

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Saying good-bye to summer break, but not to summer heat







Saying good-bye to summer break, but not to summer heat



Edited By Brian Bushart @bstockus

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Back to School Night Ignites
Presented by Jessica Bogie (@algebrainiac1), Regan Galvan (@ReganGalvan), and Sarah DiMaria (@MsDiMaria)

For those who want new ideas on how to set up their back to school night, this session is for you!

To join the meeting when it starts at 9pm Eastern (or RSVP if it’s before 9pm), click here.

Last week we recapped favorite moments from Twitter Math Camp 2016.

Check out the recording here.

And now for more good stuff…

Extending Our Reach

Sara Van Der Werf has written a beautiful essay about losing a former student to suicide and how we, as teachers, have both an opportunity and a responsibility to reach out and provide comfort to those members of our school communities who experience loss.

To summarize Sara’s advice: go with your gut, and don’t worry so much about what you say to people who are grieving. Just try to say something, because something is better than nothing.

As many teachers prepare to begin the school year anew, it’s important to keep in mind the many ways in which our jobs extend far beyond the content we teach and into the lives of the young people we work with.

Written by Kent Haines (@KentHaines)

Contributions

It’s already three weeks since TMC16, and many, many blogposts have been created since then, but I want to take you back to the astonishingly rich blogging that was achieved every single day of the conference, including Desmos Day, by Greg Taylor (@mathtans). If you weren’t at TMC16, reading his posts will make you feel like you were. If you were at TMC16, reading these posts will make you feel like you were MORE there. And by the way, in one post, Greg asks himself what he contributes to the MTBoS. I can answer that! Just take a look at the sheer quantity and quality of his writing, starting with these puppies:

Descon

Entry 1

Entry 2

Entry 3

Entry 4

After TMC

This is just the tip of the iceberg – Greg actually wrote more posts than those I’ve listed, the links to which are embedded in his daily posts. They go into more detail about specific sessions. Normally, when I write for this newsletter, I put some kind of summary about the post(s) in my article, but there’s just so much here, summarizing would take up a few newsletters. Enjoy – I know I did!

Written by Audrey McLaren (@a_mcsquared)

A Post About Posts, About Posts, About Posts

Mike Wiernicki literally created a black hole of blog posts. As he discussed his work with Blogarithm, he opened the #MTBoS up to multiple blog posts to satisfy anyone’s math palate. His Blogarithm post began with a brief discussion of a 6th grade lesson on building fluency in multiplication using the Pythagoras Square. Then he encouraged us to look at recently added posts to NCTM’s Blogarithm. Much to my surprise, there were many, many posts to choose from.

Rethinking the Gradual Release of Responsibility Model by Tim McCaffrey provides a perspective of many math and science teachers – start with an investigation. Gradual release has become a bit of an education catch phrase. Often those who implement this model try to remain true to the flow laid out within the book written by Fisher and Frey: I do, We do, You do.  McCaffrey’s post provides practical ways to keep inquiry within the math lesson and establish a student-centered environment. He follows this up with Reel ’Em In and discusses an eighth grade lesson using the reverse model of “I do, we do, you do.” He aimed to paint a clear picture, and I think he accomplished that.

Matt Kitchen answers the age old question “When Am I Ever Going to Use This?” with his social emotional response to students’ frustration. Most think we should just explain to students how the math concept we are teaching connects to something we do in real life. Kitchen shows there’s a time and a place. Once we help students process their frustrations, we can have discussions with them as discussed in Show Students the Real Purpose of Math.

I could go on and on, because as I said, it is a black hole.  Go get lost, friends. 🙂

Written by Jenise Sexton (@MrsJeniseSexton)

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This Week: Moving Forward and Responding to “I’m Bad at Math”







This Week: Moving Forward and Responding to "I'm Bad at Math"



Edited By Sahar Khatri @khatrimath

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Still enjoying the sun…for just a bit longer

It’s still summer vacation in most time zones so it’s the same for webinars at Global Math. We’ll be back in August.  If you really miss us (and we know you do!) check out the recordings of prior webinars here!

Great Blogging Action

We’re ALL Valuable Mathematicians

I’ve really started paying attention to getting my students to identify themselves as mathematicians in the last few years and I’ve seen some great progress.  I definitely needed a mindset change myself to think of them in this way, but once I did it really opened up my students and I have seen awesome things happen as a result.

But I just realized something:  I have held onto an unproductive disposition about something Megan Schmidt called me out on in her latest post.  I am guilty playing the blame game against the system and wishing that elementary/middle school math teachers had a specialty in math.  But they are working hard and are mathematicians regardless and I need to remember that!  Plus, pointing the finger at anybody really doesn’t do any good.

Megan makes some good points:

  • We lament in high school about kids lacking number sense, but how do our classroom routines support and build on the number sense kids have created through the primary grades?

  • the ideas need to connect from counting to arithmetic to algebra to calculus and all the places in between.

 

Instead of pointing fingers or over-idealizing, we need to take active steps to become a part of the mathematics community beyond our areas.  We must aim for proper pedagogy and learn more about what we teach together, which Megan links to Tracy Zager’s TMC Keynote.  Growth and forward progress will happen via communication and collaboration as a coherent group.  

Basically, we need to listen to each other and realize that we are in this together
 

So I ask:  How am I becoming involved with elementary or middle school teachers around me?  What about university professors?  Do professors think the same things about me as a secondary math teacher and, if so, how can I work with them to convince them otherwise?  Thanks, Megan, for bringing me back to reality and prompting me to become part of the change I wish to see!

~ by Matthew Engle (@pickpocketbme)

“Extraordinary things can happen when we do math and talk about teaching together, preK-16+”  
Tracy Zager

Hi, I’m Not Good at Math

As the beginning of the school year rapidly approaches (or some have already started), I can’t help but be reminded of meeting students for the first time who say something like,

I’m not good at math.

Or eventually, I’ll meet parents of my students and hear comments like,

Billy was good at math until last year.

or

Susie has always struggled at math.

My worst response was something like, “I’m sorry to hear that.”

My best response was maybe something like, “Tell me more about that.”

If you’re anything like me and have the tendency to lock up at these situations, I believe it is in everyone’s best interest to read (and follow the links at) Christopher Danielson’s recent post titled, On Helping Children to Love Math

I look at it as a chance for us to reflect on our beliefs and rehearse some responses to positively message the importance of mathematical thinking and education. Don’t skip his Hot Chocolate conversation and the simple example we can give parents to practice with their children.

~by Andrew Stadel (@mr_stadel)

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Enjoying Summer Vacation







Enjoying Summer Vacation



Edited By Carl Oliver @carloliwitter

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Summer Vacay!

It’s summer vacation for webinars at Global Math. We’ll be back in August.  We’re sad, too! There’s never been a better time to binge watch recordings of past presentations. Check them all out here!

Great Blogging Action

The TMC Ripple Effect

Don’t worry campers, TMC16 has come and gone but the math memories live forever.

 

If you were unable to make it to Augsburg College last week you can get caught up at the Twitter Math Camp Workspace. The site hosts all the keynotes, morning and breakout sessions, and My Favorites.  As tweeps blog and reflect on their TMC16 experience they’ll be posted under Recap and Reflection Blogposts.  

But in the meantime, if you’re still not sure if TMC is for you, you’ll want to read Greta’s thoughtful post as a first time TMCer.  I think it’s fair to say that Sara VandeWerf tweet below sums it up best.

Next year TMC17 will be hosted in Atlanta.  Hope you can make it!

Written by @gfletchy

Hot on Twitter: Back to School Sale Price Comparisons

AGilliam 

Real world purpose for unit rate! I got the she’s crazy look for taking pictures. #mtbos #msmathchat

 

Other goings on around the Blogosphere

In between escaping the recent heat wave, and travelling with the family, I’ve taken some time to read some of the new blog posts written by new bloggers following TMC. Collectively these blogs are great for people sitting on the fence about blogging, both new and old. 

Annie Perkins has received positive praise for Well, That Escalated Quickly. In this piece Annie manages to describe the myriad complexities of teaching in the space between zero and one. 

Hannah Mesick cannon-balled into the blogging world  with her post Jumping In. Mesick cites the amazing Brene Brown’s book Daring Greatly, and then proceeds to do just that while describing the vulnerability required to join the MTBoS conversation.

Lastly, you should check out the post From a MTBoS Stalker by Greta Lynn. At TMC this year Greta heard the quote “there are no rockstar teachers” and took it to heart, realizing that the people who start blogging are just trying to learn like everyone else. This post describes the reasons why she blogs, and how it will help her journey as a teacher.

Additionally, Julie Reulbach is looking for Algebra 2 teachers to sign up for #alg2chat before the new year starts. She is motivated to make the hashtag more useful for everyone. If you or anyone you know teaches Algebra 2, visit and sign up on the google form.

If you are out and about this summer, maybe you want to participate in the #mathphoto16 challenge. Below are photos were some of the ones that line up with this weeks theme #shapes. If you have an interesting photo please post it to twitter with the #mathphoto16 hashtag. If you want to scroll through and see all of the previous photos, follow @mathphoto16 on twitter. If looking at twitter isn’t your bag, you can also see photos on flickr and wordpress.com. Happy snapping!

-Carl Oliver (@carloliwitter)

#shapes #mathphoto16 “@henryseg: A driveway in Heidelberg, Germany. https://t.co/zryjx4JoBq” – @TheErickLee

  • #mathphoto16 #shapes in Amsterdam https://t.co/i503N6xefU – @debboden
  • #shapes #mathphoto16 Hey, somebody had to do it… https://t.co/GwExIA4oaP – @jillenelouise
  • #shapes #mathphoto16 “@henryseg: A driveway in Heidelberg, Germany. https://t.co/zryjx4JoBq” – @TheErickLee

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Sleepaway Camp







Sleepaway Camp



Edited By Brian Bushart @bstockus

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Summer Vacay!

It’s summer vacation for webinars at Global Math. We’ll be back in August.  We’re sad, too! There’s never been a better time to binge watch recordings of past presentations. Check them all out here!

Math Camping in Minneapolis

Dammit, I Want In!

This weekend marks #TMC16 held in Minneapolis, MN. I’ve reviewed the program and looked at numerous posts on Twitter and have decided, “Dammit, I want in!” I no longer want to learn vicariously through the posts of the loyal #MTBoS, although the posts have been enlightening.  

Thanks @jreulbach for this collection of notes.

From posts like these:

 

I’m going to begin “stacking my chips” to be present for Twitter Math Camp 2017.  I’m sure I’m not the only one looking forward to the blog posts which will come out of this year’s #TMC16.

Written by Jenise Sexton (@MrsJeniseSexton)

Twitter Math Camp – The Video Experience

Not everyone can be at Twitter Math Camp, but that doesn’t mean you have to miss out on everything that’s going on! Glenn Waddell has you covered on his YouTube channel (Thank you, Glenn!) where he has been sharing videos of the My Favorites sessions as well as the powerful keynotes from Jose Vilson, Tracy Zager, and our very own Global Math Co-Chair Dylan Kane. There’s even a musical number from Gregory Taylor that is not to be missed.

By the time this newsletter finds its way to your inbox, we’ll likely know the location and dates of TMC17. If you’d like to join in the fun in person next summer, get that on your calendar now! Also, be sure to follow @TMathC so you don’t miss announcements about speaker proposals and registration dates.

 

Written by Brian Bushart (@bstockus)

This Game is A-Maze-ing

This week the math puzzle app Sumaze made the rounds on Twitter. It’s a maze game that incorporates all sorts of mathematical concepts into each level’s solution. And best of all, it’s free! Download the app for iOS or Android.

If you like the game, the sequel was just released. It uses fractions, decimals, and percentages and can be a great challenge for older kids or adults.

 

Written by Kent Haines (@KentHaines)

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This week: Social Justice, Math Mistakes, and PCMI







This week: Social Justice, Math Mistakes, and PCMI



Edited By Sahar Khatri @khatrimath

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Reminder, it’s summer vacation for webinars at Global Math. We’ll be back in August.  

Is this how it’s going to be from now on each summer? Guns, police, death and protests?

Math educators on twitter were searching for a response. Jose Vilson called for integrating issues of equity into standard curricular topics. So did Avery Pickford: “Imagine MP #9: Use mathematical tools to critique social constructs and promote positive change.”

What could this look like? Rethinking Schools has a book. Radical Math has a “Guide for Integrating Issues of Social and Economic Justice into Mathematics Curriculum.” It includes advice, sample problems, and a lengthy table with links to online data resources sorted by mathematical area. For example, under “fractions” they list a link to the site “Cost of War”. They also suggest lessons on AIDS, the lottery, gentrification and factors impacting high school graduation rates.

Scrolling through the guide, I wondered what a version of the guide would look like under other political influences. A statistics lesson on political affiliation and bias in? Using percents to show the failure of the welfare state? If equitable math instruction involves incorporating your politics, does having wrong politics make you a worse math teacher? I worry about this, but that doesn’t mean this project isn’t important and worth pursuing.

Beyond a socially relevant curriculum, there is also the question of policy. Danny Martin questions whether NCTM is truly committed to equity in mathematics. After all, NCTM’s focus (in Principles to Action and other documents) is on excellent teaching, curriculum and resources equitably distributed. This, Martin argues, is a policy that is fundamentally incapable of closing achievement gaps, even if it would lead to absolute gains for all.

I’ve read the NCTM response a few times now, and I can’t make sense of it. It seems to accept Martin’s critique while simultaneously reframing it. (“While we have made progress, we have not made enough progress. We all need to do more.”) In any event, the last lines are the most interesting: “Those interested in collaborating in this work should contact NCTM at change@nctm.org.”

(Thank you to Bryan Meyer, Megan Schmidt and Tracy Zager for sharing many of the links above.)

~by Michael Pershan (@mpershan)

Desmathmistakes Activity

 

Michael Pershan recently posted about using a math mistake from a 4th grader in a Desmos Activity.  Imagine how potentially powerful this could be for you, your students, and colleagues.

I simply would like to share a half-dozen reasons WHY I like Michael’s Desmos Activity.

  1. Error analysis

  2. The teacher can capture student thinking from the class

  3. Students might be able to help their classmates have a deeper understanding of the [insert math topic] concepts being taught

  4. Teachers experience a different way to learn more about the tools and uses of Desmos Activity builder

  5. Students experience a different way to learn more about the tools and uses of Desmos Activity builder

  6. Imagine teachers quickly putting an activity together with a student mistake from their class and then sharing it with their students and colleagues to analyze.

Great inspiration, Michael. Read more here.

~ by Andrew Stadel @mr_stadel

PCMI (Park City Math Institute) 2016 is in full swing.
Check out the highlights!

Play along with PCMI Problem Sets (click here)!




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Global Math’s Out for Summer!







Global Math's Out for Summer!



Edited By Brian Bushart @bstockus

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Summer Vacay!

It’s summer vacation for webinars at Global Math. We’ll be back in August.  We’re sad, too! There’s never been a better time to binge watch recordings of past presentations. Check them all out here!

Summer Reading to Tide You Over

Reading My Mind

One of my favorite bloggers is Dane Ehlert because when I pull up his blog he has written on a topic I have been pondering for a while. This week, he had a vision for grading, something I’ve been mulling over for a week or so now. As I read this post, I opened myself up and allowed his views to challenge my perspective on grading.

As most educators look for what’s easy, Dane considers what’s best for his students. Dane considers a balance between traditional grading practices and standards based grading practices. In reading his post, it appears he has arrived at this conclusion himself, standards based grading is a better system for student learning today. As I venture back into the classroom to teach one segment of Introduction to Algebra, I must consider if I’m up for embodying the vision in which Dane discussed in this post.

I conclude, hell yeah I am!

Written by Jenise Sexton (@MrsJeniseSexton)

Secondary Number Talks

In Sara Van Der Werf’s latest post she throws down the gauntlet, challenging all secondary math teachers to try out number talks 30 times next school year. Why? Because we as teachers can either continue to lament students’ lack of numeracy skills and point fingers at prior teachers, or we can do something about it. Sara wants us to do something about it!

Thankfully she’s willing to help us out. Her post is a treasure trove of resources – descriptions of how she does number talks, links to books and helpful blog posts, and ideas for connecting number talks to what we’re already covering in class.

Don’t take my word for it. Read her post! She’ll convince you with ducks.

 

Written by Brian Bushart (@bstockus)

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