This Week at the Global Math Department

Edited By Casey McCormick @cmmteach
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Online Professional Development Sessions

How to Expose It: Contemporary Mathematics at the High School Level
Presented by: Nitsa Movshovitz-Hadar
This presentation will focus on an R&D project aimed at exposing high school students to contemporary mathematics by periodically sharing with them Math News Snapshots (MNSs). Metaphorically speaking the idea is to take high school students on a glass bottom boat tour over the deep, colorful, vivid, often stormy mathematical ocean, for 45 minutes, once a month or so. The rationale, the definition of MNS, MNSs development, and results of their implementation will be discussed. You may wish to take a few minutes to familiarize yourself with the website.

To join this meeting when it starts at 9pm Eastern (or RSVP if it’s before 9pm), click here.

Last week  the Global Math Department took a break. Don’t forget – recordings for all previously held webinars can be found here.

The #MTBoS Never Sleeps

Hallway Math

I recently saw a tweet from Heather Dodge about her fantastic estimation bulletin board. I really like how interactive bulletin boards can bring mathematics outside of the classroom and into the broader school community. They help to create a positive culture of mathematics in a school.

Heather’s tweet made me think of the other examples of mathematics bulletin boards I’ve seen or heard about. Some math activities just seem to be a great fit for a spot in the hallway. Kim Figura shared an example of a Which One Doesn’t Belong bulletin board and Danielle Marchandshared her Year Game bulletin board.

Interactive bulletin boards seem like a great way to promote mathematical conversations and inspire collaboration. Tracy Zager, in her book Becoming the Math Teacher You Wish You’d Had, wrote “Mathematicians frequently talk about standing around blackboards or whiteboards together, thinking and talking. […] This particular kind of collaboration – standing, talking, thinking and writing – is so inherent to doing mathematics that many buildings are designed around it.” If you don’t have space for a whole bulletin board… no problem. How about just posting a math puzzle or problem in the hallway? Sara VanDerWerf wrote a great blog post about how she experimented with this and the surprising results she saw. Read her post Even if they say they don’t like doing math, they secretly do. An Experiment you should try.

Written by Erick Lee (@TheErickLee)

Got Relationship?

Jenise Sexton gifts us with a brief, yet powerful post to reflect on the relationships we have (or don’t) with students. In here post, The Push Without Relationships, she shares a few experiences and practical bits of advice. These three quotes from her post say a lot about the impact of relationship.

A common confession about students:

“The ones who when they were absent I secretly rejoiced because I knew the class would run smoothly.”

About lesson plans:

“You can have the best laid plans for your classroom, but without relationship those plans can easily go awry.”

About the necessity of relationship:

“Relationship is the important aspect of teaching that gets you through the tough moments.”

But wait, there’s more… go read her post. It’s not too late to create positively impactful relationships with your students.

Written by Andrew Stadel (@mr_stadel)

Virtual Strangers

It’s been a week since NCTM in San Diego, but many observed that this meeting felt different.

Some have even blogged about their experience, including first-time blogger, Hema Khodai. Reading her piece, entitled Virtual Strangers, gave me the confirmation that relationships first formed through social media can indeed be the support that sustains us.

Hema shouts out the #ClearTheAir community and its intersection with math educators. And, she acknowledges that she received something she perhaps did not expect to receive: a sense of belonging. As we think about what we want in math spaces, I think her blog is an important piece of that puzzle. No more spoilers. Please read.

Written by Marian Dingle (@DingleTeach)

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This Week at the Global Math Department

This Week at the Global Math Department

Edited By Chase Orton @mathgeek76
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Online Professional Development Sessions

STEM Content Knowledge and Affect in the K-16 Classroom
Presented by Evelyn Laffey
National discourse on science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) urges educators to attend to the growing demand for a STEM-literate populace. But, what is “STEM-literacy,” and how do we, as educators, cultivate opportunities for students to enhance their STEM-literacy, as well as their STEM content knowledge and affect? In this session, I will share action research (conducted at the university and high school levels) that aims to understand the impact of engineering modules on students’ cognition and affect. I will share the framework for STEM-literacy and affect, as well as the data collection tools and analysis methods that can be adapted for use in your classroom.

To join this meeting tonight when it starts at 9pm Eastern (or RSVP if it’s before 9pm), click here.

Did you miss last week’s webinar? Click here to watch “Activating Curiosity & Creativity in the Modern Mathematics Classroom.”

The #MTBoS Never Sleeps

Hello all,

My name is Christelle Rocha (@Maestra_Rocha), I’m a 7th and 8th grade math teacher in Los Angeles, California and Desmos Fellow, Cohort 3. I’m excited to join the Global Math Department and want to introduce myself by sharing my top five, all-time favorite pieces.


In Strategies versus Models: Why This is Important, Pamela Harris (@pwharris) challenges me to rethink my views of math and math instruction.

Marian Dingle (@DingleTeach) and Jose Vilson (@TheJLV) speak on my “why” for teaching math. While Marian’s powerful thread shows the individual, day-to-day impact of math education, Jose speaks on the broader implications of our work in Math as a Social Justice Lever.

As fulfilling and vital as teaching can be, Is the first-year teacher in your life crying in the car? Here are five things you should know by Roxanna Elden (@RoxannaElden) and Teaching Saves My Life Every Single Day by Christina Torres (@biblio_phile) remind me teaching is exhausting for everyone, which means self-advocacy and self-preservation are essential to continue doing the work I love.

Christelle Rocha (@Maestra_Rocha)

Podcasts for Educators

Perhaps you are like me and you have a semi-long commute to and from school everyday. Or perhaps you’re like me and you run long distances at a time. Either way I have found out that these are both perfect conditions to listen to podcasts. The podcasts about true crime or the life of Americans (see what I did there?) are the ones I usually like to fill my time. But I saw this tweet from Mike Mohammad (@Mo_physics) and realized there is an entire subculture of podcasts that focus on educators.

He pulled all the recommendations and created a blog post that you can find here. There are some great recommendations of people like Jennifer Gonzales (@cultofpedagogy) who’s blog I have been reading for years. In search of some more math specific podcasts, I found this article with recommendations like “My Favourite Theorem” (@myfavethm) which hosted Fawn Nguyen (@fawnpnguyen) on a recent episode.

What education-based podcasts am I missing out on that I really need to give a listen? Which one from these suggestions are you ready to try?

By Amber Thienel (@amberthienel)

[Editor’s Note: I love Drew Perkin’s TeachThought podcast. Check it out! Here’s an episode when he interviews Dan Meyer (@ddmeyer). Um, it gets a little heated. Well worth the listen.]

Rethinking Math Modeling
I’ve been doing a lot of thinking about math modeling and facilitating some workshops with teachers. We’ve been using math modeling as an anchor through some lesson study work and it’s been fantastic.

Robert Kaplinsky has three webinars about math modeling, one each for elementary, middle, and high school teachers. They are well worth the watch and useful for workshops. Give them a watch and let him know what you think.

Dan Meyer spoke on a panel about math modeling. He said it got a bit awkward. Read his blog post to find out more. He’ll leave you thinking.

I sent out this Tweet to see what the #MTBoS community had to share about math modeling, what it looks like, and how we can teach it better in our classrooms. Click on the Tweet to find the thread.

Chase Orton
@mathgeek76

GMD is Looking for Presenters!

Do you know someone who you think should lead a GMD Webinar?

Did you see something amazing at a recent conference that needs to be shared?

At Global Math we are proud of our Webinars!  We appreciate all of our presenters and look forward to bringing you the best “PD Iin Your Pajamas” on the internet.  We’re always on the lookout for fresh faces and new ideas.

Please use this recommendation form to let us know who/what should be shared next!  We will take your recommendations and reach out to try to make it happen!

Stay nerdy my friends! Got something you think should go into the GMD Newsletter, hit me up on Twitter at @mathgeek76.

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Copyright © 2019 Global Math Department, All rights reserved.
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