Thanks for a great 2015 everyone!







Thanks for a great 2015 everyone!


Edited By Carl Oliver @carloliwitter

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Online Professional Development Sessions

A lot of work from a group of dedicated volunteers goes in to making the online Global Math Department presentations and newsletters. Thanks to all of the following people for serving as a host or booker for each week’s talks, helping to organize a tweetup or as a newsetter writer or editor. 

Adrienne Shlagbaum Jonathan Claydon
Andrew Gael Julie Reulbach
Andrew Stadel Justin Lanier
Andy Gael Kate Nowak
Ashli Black Kent Haines
Audrey McLaren Leigh Nataro
Carl Oliver Megan Hayes-Golding
Chris Robinson Megan Schmidt
David Wees Michael Pershan
Dylan Kane Nik Doran
Graham Fletcher Paula Torres
Heather Kohn Rachel Kernodle
Hedge Sahar Khatri
James Cleveland Sharon Vestal
Jenise Sexton Wendy Menard
Jessica Bogie

Thanks for making 2015 a great year, and here’s to making 2016 the best ever!

The Global Math Dept Board
Ashi, Carl, Dylan, Jessica, Michael

2015 Year in Review

The first talk of 2015 was Amazing Geometry Activities with Justin Aion and Laila Nur on January 6th. Unfortunately, the video of the talk was lost. This sometimes happens due to our dependence on free services 🙁
Date Talk Newsletter
Jan 6 Amazing Geometry Activities link  
Jan 13 #makemathsocial with CueThink link 1st Official GMD Newsletter of the New Year link
Jan 20 The Why and How of Computational Thinking link This Week at Global Math – 1/20/2015 link
Jan 27 Assessments That Promote Depth and Retention of Learning link This Week at Global Math – 1/27/2015 link
Feb 3 Common Mistakes on AP Calc Exam from an AP Reader link This Week at Global Math – 2/3/2015 link
Feb 10 Project-Based Learning for Mathematical Practices link This Week at Global Math – 02/10/2015 link
Feb 17 What Does It Really Mean to Look For and Make Use of Structure? link This Week at Global Math – 2/17/2015 link
Feb 24 Starting Your Journey Toward National Board Certification in Mathematics link This Week at Global Math – 2/24/2015 link
Mar 3 Challenging Minds: Enhancing mathematical learning of African American students through games link This Week at Global Math – 03/03/2015 link
Mar 10 What It Means to “See” Your Students: Responding to the Needs of Diverse Youth link This Week at Global Math – 3/10/2015 link
Mar 17 Interesting Things found by the MTBoS link This Week at Global Math – 3/17/2015 link
Mar 24 Capturing Student Thinking – Now what? link This Week at Global Math – 03/24/2015 link
Mar 31 Which One Doesn’t Belong? link This Week at Global Math – 03/31/2015 link
_____________________

Shira Helft and Rick Barlow’s talk ‘Math Fights and Middle Bits’ was the most viewed talk of 2015, thanks in part to a plug on Dan Meyer’s blog. This is just one of the reasons why talks in May and June were the some of the most viewed talks of the year.
Date Talk Newsletter
Apr 14 Desmos link This Week at Global Math – Report from NCTM link
Apr 21 Favorites from NCTM link This Week at Global Math – 04/21/2015 link
Apr 28 “What is the MTBoS and How Do I Join?”: Reflections From NCTM link HEY! YOUR GLOBAL MATH NEWSLETTER IS HERE! link
May 5 Math Fights and Middle Bits link Global Math Newsletter! Yay! link
May 12 Beyond Beauty link This Week at Global Math – 05/12/2015 link
May 19 Open the Middle link We’re Gonna Make It! link
May 26 My Flipped Classroom link Reflecting on the year with the Global Math Department link
Jun 2 Growth Mindset: Laying the Foundation for the Revolution link This Week at Global Math – 06/02/2015 *updated* link
Jun 9 Spiraling Deeper with Activity Based Learning in Mathematics link Join the Summer Math Party! link
Jun 16 Shadow Con – Transforming the Conference Experience link Summer Math Photo Challenge link
Jun 23 My Favorite link This Week at Global Math – 06/23/2015 link
Jun 30 What Makes Problems Complex? link Conference Bonanza! link
_____________________

Number Talks were a popular topic for talks as well as in newsletters in 2015, largely due to one of 2015’s most popular Math Ed books “Making Number Talks Matter.”
Date Talk Newsletter
Aug 4 Twitter Math Camp 2015 Recap – My Favorites link Global Math is back tonight! link
Aug 11 What To Do On the First Day of School link Ready or Not, School is here! – Revised slightly link
Aug 18 Lesson Study In Action link Global Math Tonight! link
Aug 25 Problem-Based Learning in Math: Clarifying Misconceptions and Understanding Differences link Summer comes to an end link
Sep 1 Social Dynamics and Math Discussions link Welcome to September! link
Sep 8 Introduction to Number Talks for Grades K to 12 link Let’s Talk Numbers! link
Sep 15 Warm-Ups = What Are They Good For? link So Many Resources! link
Sep 22 Open House/Back To School Night link What are your goals for the year? link
Sep 29 Mathematics & Music link Welcome fall (or spring, depending on your hemisphere)! link
Oct 6 Mathematical Modeling link Modeling, Number Talks, and more link
Oct 13 Socratic Seminars in the Math Classroom link This week at the Global Math Department link
Oct 20 An Update on Initiatives from the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics link Coming to you live from Global Math Department…it’s NCTM! link
Oct 27 On-Ramps to Mathematical Thinking for Students with Learning Disabilities Through the SMPs link Fall is learning season for teachers! link
_____________________

The last talk in 2015 was John Scammell asking the question “What Does Formative Assessment Look Like In Math Class?” on December 22, 2015
Date Talk Newsletter
Nov 3 Be Your Own Professional Development link Candy Fun, MTBoS Love, and a Building Community link
Nov 10 High Fives and Trust: Why Relationships Must Come First link Global Math Department Requests the Highest of Fives and Your Attendance Tonight link
Nov 17 Seeing Stars: Using Art to Spark Investigation in Math Class link Learning from Sea to Shining Sea link
Dec 1 Tools for Customization: What Does Customized Learning Look Like? link The First Global Math Department of the Last Month of 2015 is Tonight link
Dec 8 Twitter Math Camp: History and 2016 Preview link Food For Thought link
Dec 15 Designing Systems of Teacher Learning Around Student Work link Hour of Code, ESSA news, and more! link
Dec 22 What Does Formative Assessment Look Like In Math Class? link This Week: A Very Merry Global Math to You and Yours link

And for a preview of next week’s talk ‘PCMI: The Experience’, try to work through problems 2-8 of this problem set. Don’t forget to read the directions!

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This Week: A Very Merry Global Math to You and Yours







This Week: A Very Merry Global Math to You and Yours



Edited By Brian Bushart @bstockus

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What Does Formative Assessment Look Like in Math Class?
Students and teachers need feedback from each other in order to meet curricular standards. Join John Scammell (@thescamdog) to look at ways of embedding feedback into math lessons and what to do with that feedback.

To join the meeting when it starts at 9pm Eastern (or RSVP if it’s before 9pm), click here.

Last week at Global Math Geoff Krall presented on teacher learning through student work analysis. 
Click here to watch the recording.

Something to Read on Those Long Winter Nights

A Notable Progression

Whenever I write for GMD, I try to do so from a middle school perspective.  This week, the elementary teacher in me screamed at The Progression of Multiplication written by @gfletchy.  Not only does it give a quick but powerful view of multiplication from 2nd to 5th grade for elementary teachers, but I feel it will be as equally helpful to my middle school friends.  6th grade teachers need to know from where students’ understanding comes.  6th and 7th grade teachers alike will find a method for simplifying and factoring expressions within the strategies discussed within 3rd and 4th grades.  8th and 9th grade teachers can glean ideas for teaching the multiplication of binomials and polynomials from a conceptual perspective.  So much to learn here.

Written by Jenise Sexton (@MrsJeniseSexton)

The Most Wonderful Time of the Career
 

launch.JPG

 

It’s the most wonderful time of the year – or at least the most wonderful time to be a math teacher. There are some really smart people out there creating truly great tools for math teachers. The tools I’m writing about this week came to us from Desmos and GeoGebra.

 

This week, Christmas came early, thanks to Desmos. They released their new delight, their new game-changer, and it was literally a delightful game called Marbleslides. It’s easy to deploy to your students, it’s easy for them to jump right into it, it’s addictive, and it’s chock full of math goodness. It’s as if a really cool video game married the Desmos activity builder. You can read about it here, or you can just search #marbleslides on Twitter.  Or just sign up at teacher.desmos.com, and play it yourself!

A couple of weeks ago, GeoGebra released their newest feature – GeoGebra Groups. As if GeoGebra hadn’t already transformed my life enough, they’ve now made it really easy to combine many media, like for example a GeoGebra or a video, with a task, send it to all your students with one click, see their work, and have a discussion about it with them all in the same space. You can read more about it here.  All my students are now signed up, and I can’t wait to use it in the New Year.

Written by Audrey McLaren (@a_mcsquared)

Count With Me
 

 

This week Joe Schwartz (@JSchwartz10A) shared the story of Alex, a 1st grader who is having some issues with counting. Is Alex counting 14 or 100 dogs? He thinks it’s both! Read Joe’s excellent blog post to hear more of Alex’s story.
Oh, and this is one time where you totally should check out the comments. No, seriously! Counting is something we might take for granted as adults, but it’s quite the complex and multi-faceted skill for young children to grapple with. The #MTBoS community came out in force to offer their thoughts and support.

Check out Joe’s post and the fantastic conversation in the comments at his blog.

Written by Brian Bushart (@bstockus)

Global Math Department Needs Your Help!

The Global Math Department is looking for individuals who are interested in planning the Tuesday night webinars hosted on Big Marker. GMD bookers contact potential speakers regarding speaking opportunities, and provide them with details on planning sessions. If you are interested in being more involved with the Global Math Department, contact Heather at heather.m.kohn@gmail.com or Dylan at dkane47@gmail.com.

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Hour of Code, ESSA news, and more!







Hour of Code, ESSA news, and more!



Edited By Ashli Black @mythagon

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How do we develop sustained growth in teacher practice in a department? One way is to design a system of teacher learning based on student artifacts. Join Geoff Krall (@emergentmath) as he shares experiences and models of student work analysis that lead to better instructional choices and departmental coherence. The conference starts at 9pm Eastern/6pm Pacific. Click here to join!

Last week, Dylan Kane, Jessica Bogie, and Lisa Henry presented on Twitter Math Camp: History and 2016 Preview. Whether you’re interested in making the trip to Minnesota, or just want to learn more about Twitter Math Camp, check out the recording here if you missed the presentation.

Things to Check Out

The Hour of Math…wait, Code! The Hour of Code!

 

lisa.JPG

 

Last week was marked on the educational calendar as computer science week. If you are not hip to coding in the classroom please go now to code.org, but then come back!

 

Now that you’re an expert at coding in the classroom you may be wondering, “What if I don’t have 30 devices for each student to become the next Mark Zuckerberg?” Well, they’ve thought of that too. Thinkersmith in partnership with code.org has devises a litany of “unplugged” coding activities for the device-less to also become programming wizards.  coding.JPG

 

Also Brian Aspinall has posted numerous activities to his blog about “unplugged” coding, here and here. Luckily for us coding shouldn’t just be limited to just one week during the school year. Code.org has a beyond the hour of code, which consists of courses and activities meant for what they refer to as ages 8-108.

 

For you geometry teachers, code.org also has something called Artist, where students explore geometry through coding.

 

Happy Coding!

written by Andrew Gael (@bkdidact)

Exploring the MathTwitterBlogosphere

 

In January, Jon Orr will be a mentor to help support math teachers new to this online community known as the Math Twitter Blogosphere. In his recent blog post, Jon says,

 

Following this weird #MTBOS hashtag on twitter has changed my teaching practice in so many ways. The people are amazing and always willing to share a lesson or strategy…

 

His post shares a glimpse of why he’s excited to mentor other teachers and how his collaboration with other teachers has benefited his students and teaching. Whether you’re looking for a New Year’s resolution or a way to deposit some good karma coins in your math teacher bank, join this initiative as a mentor or someone to be mentored.

Why say no, when it will feel so good to say yes? Exploring the MathTwitterBlogosphere.

 

written by Andrew Stadel (@mr_stadel)


What the ESSA?

I still remember hearing teachers talk about “Nickel-B” when I first got into the classroom in the aughts and being ever so confused. When I finally asked and had bits of NCLB explained to me, I was still confused as it seemed far removed from my little classroom world. Over the years the talk of teacher preparation and student testing as they are affected by NCLB became more relevant to my students and my profession. This go around I’m trying to do some reading up on the latest ACT and figured I would share the goods as the holiday’s are coming and there is nothing like family asking about headline education bills to spice up the dinner conversation. (note: this is totally true in my family since at the dinner table there are 4 teachers with a combined classroom experience of over 70 years.)

One place to start is over at NCTM where Diane Briars posted on the signing. This article sticks to the positive and gets into an overview of the act and the bits that NCTM supported. This is definitely not the whole picture, so let’s dig deeper.

The official site for ESSA is here and it has fact sheets, the actual text if you feel like some policy reading, and quotes from remarks made about the act.

The folks over at The Atlantic seem lukewarm about the act, noting “in reality, schools may not see much on-the-ground change”.

Lastly, this article from the Washington Post on ‘The disturbing provisions about teacher preparation in No Child Left Behind rewrite‘ hit my Facebook page and email several times and is an interesting look from a professor at the University of Washington at bits of ESSA not about student testing.

Hopefully these will get you started and give you some things to think about and chat with others about.
 

written by Ashli Black (@mythagon)

Global Math Department Needs Your Help!

The Global Math Department is looking for individuals who are interested in planning the Tuesday night webinars hosted on Big Marker. GMD bookers contact potential speakers regarding speaking opportunities, and provide them with details on planning sessions. If you are interested in being more involved with the Global Math Department, contact Heather at heather.m.kohn@gmail.com or Dylan at dkane47@gmail.com.

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Food For Thought







Food For Thought



Edited By Carl Oliver @carloliwitter

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What better time to talk about #TMC16, than the middle of December? This week, Dylan Kane, Jessica Bogie, and Lisa Henry begin talking about the summer in Twitter Math Camp: History and 2016 Preview. Whether you’re interested in making the trip to Minnesota, or just want to learn more about Twitter Math Camp, Join us tonight at 9 EST here. If you want to speak at TMC or want more information click here.

Last week we Joined Joshua Schmidt for an honest look into his current customized mathematics learning environment that he has developed over the past six years. His goal has been to create an environment that provides authentic choices, independent pacing, and learning at the students’ appropriate level. This work has come with many successes and challenges. He will give insights into his classroom environment and his choice of technologies. Since customized learning takes on a variety of shapes, he wants to provide not only a better understanding of customization but also ideas that you can put into practice in your own classroom. View the recording here 

Great Blogging Action

Food For Thought

There’s been a lot of chatter and blogging about the great things that went on at the NCTM Regional Conference in Nashville; if you, like me, were not fortunate enough to attend, you might have been feeling somewhat bereft as you read through events you might have missed.  But if you read through Kate Nowak’spresentation, “Plan a Killer Lesson Today”, you may become (as I did ) pretty jazzed by the simplicity and brilliance of her ideas.  Kate’s blog, f(t), has some wonderful posts about taking procedural lessons and turning them into puzzles for students to solve, and the slides from her NCTM talk break down and clarify that process.  It’s a great resource, and I personally want to thank Kate for sharing her blueprint.  Beth Ferguson over at Algebra’s Friend wrote about another way to make the requisite practice of a skill (polynomial long and synthetic division) engaging using a game.   
 
The title “25 Tips to Deal with Digital Distractions” caught my eye when the Teach Thought  post popped up in my Feedly list.  Great, I thought – they’ll tell me how to deal with the plague of notifications that cause students to stare at their laps during my scintillating lessons.  But, as it turns out, the list is just as much for keeping me focused as those I teach.  Updated from a post 3 years ago to keep up with technological changes, there are specific useful strategies for minimizing the sidetracking effect of your device when needed.
 
The Food for Thought Department: When I need to call my class back from their group discussions, I frequently call out, “Mathematicians!”  I’ve always told my students that this is what they are for the duration of their stay in my classroom, and I get a charge every time it gets their attention, because for at least a moment, they are taking themselves that seriously.   But do I take myself that seriously?  Andrew Stadel pondered this question in his post, “Are You a Mathematician?”  It’s not only worth a read, but also a laminated print-out.  
 
And finally, Glenn Waddell challenged us high school teachers to better engage our students In “HS Teachers, up your game”.  Glenn posits that students may be checking out in high school not because they don’t understand, but because we are not connecting ideas in the higher mathematics they are know studying with things they have already been taught, and adding developmentally appropriate depth to their prior knowledge.  The Common Core standards have introduced a lot of rich content in earlier grades; we are beginning to teach high school students who have encountered this content when younger.  It’s not just a matter of transitioning our curriculum any more; we’ve got to examine at what level we need to meet our students.  Like I said, food for thought.
 
Cheers – 
Wendy Menard 
@wmukluk
_____________________

Talking about Numbers

The proliferation of Number Talks in elementary schools across North America is astonishing.  As teachers scramble to learn and implement Number Talks, GMD’s Brian Bushart threw down a Number Talk PL gauntlet that shouldn’t go unrecognized. 
Whether you’re a savvy veteran of Number Talks or just diving in, you’ll walk away smarter than when you woke up.  You could take Brian’s post and immediately turn around and implement it at you own school.  Kudos to Brian and thanks for making us all a little smarter.
 Inline image 1

 
Last week Pierre Trancemontagn unveiled another beauty of a crowdsourcing website that supports the power of the #MTBoS and the work of effective Number Talks.  Number Talk Images is sure to follow the success of Which One Doesn’t Belong.  So check it out, fire up your camera, and spread the love.

Inline image 2

 
And last but not least, Christy Sutton recently shared Always, Sometimes, Never questions her blog for k-5 folks.  K-2 teachers are screaming for more #MTBoS-like resources that support the lower grades and Christy delivered.  When you stop by…tell her thanks.
 
Written by @gfletchy (Graham Fletcher)

_____________________

100 Numbers to Get Students to Talking

Inline image 1
Group work has forever been the bane of my existence as a student and it continues into my teaching years. As a student, I was always the one who ended up doing all the work. As a teacher, I see one student who ends of doing most of the work while the others just copy the “smart one”. This past week Sara Vanderwerf (@saravdwerf) shared an activity to get all of her students talking just by finding 100 numbers within a given period. The goal, in Sara’s words, is to teach students “how to work in groups and teach them how to talk to one another”. The following highlights the activity:
  • Students work in groups to find numbers in consecutive order, highlighting them in different colors.
  • Students are timed with the goal being to get to the highest number possible.
  • Time is set aside for multiple rounds so that groups attempt to reach a higher number each round than the previous round.
  • While students are working, she takes pictures and shares them with her students after the activity, many of whom are so focused they didn’t even realize their photo was being taken! 
  • The day ends with a reflection by students responding to, “What does great group work in math look like?” 
  • The following day students work in groups to practice great group work!

Check out Sara’s blog for details as well as Megan Schmidt’s (@Veganmathbeagleadaptation of the activity in her latest blog post. And do it! 

Global Math Department Needs Your Help!

The Global Math Department is looking for individuals who are interested in planning the Tuesday night webinars hosted on Big Marker. GMD bookers contact potential speakers regarding speaking opportunities, and provide them with details on planning sessions. If you are interested in being more involved with the Global Math Department, contact Heather at heather.m.kohn@gmail.com or Dylan at dkane47@gmail.com.

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The First Global Math Department of the Last Month of 2015 is Tonight







The First Global Math Department of the Last Month of 2015 is Tonight



Edited By Brian Bushart @bstockus

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Tools for Customization: What Does Customized Learning Look Like?
Join Joshua Schmidt for an honest look into his current customized mathematics learning environment that he has developed over the past six years. His goal has been to create an environment that provides authentic choices, independent pacing, and learning at the students’ appropriate level. This work has come with many successes and challenges. He will give insights into his classroom environment and his choice of technologies. Since customized learning takes on a variety of shapes, he wants to provide not only a better understanding of customization but also ideas that you can put into practice in your own classroom.

To join the meeting when it starts at 9pm Eastern (or RSVP if it’s before 9pm), click here.

Don’t worry! You didn’t miss Global Math last week. We took a week off for the Thanksgiving holiday.
 

Don’t go yet! We have great things to share.

Educating the Heart

 

 

One of the wonderful things about being a part of #mtbos is the opportunities to glean ideas and information from others.  This time, @lisabej_manitou post of notes and scattered thoughts from a recent brain based teaching and learning conference enlightened me.  In Notes and Scattered Thoughts from Learning & the Brain Conference, Lisa shares information about the correlation between stress and learning, building student resilience, tackling anxiety and educating the heart.

 

Implications for your math instruction

This post reminded me of articles and blog posts I’ve read about social emotional learning.  If we meet the needs of our students emotionally, or educate the heart, students will be in a better position to learn.  It is a matter of seeing them as real children first, versus a group of emotionless and sometimes nameless faces we much teach a list of standards before an arbitrary deadline.  (By the way, if you don’t know the names of the students sitting in your classroom, put yourself in their shoes, how would you feel if someone who is supposed to be investing in your life didn’t know your name.)

 

Equally important, Lisa’s post discussed building resilience and two key statements stuck out to me.

  1. Build resilience by allowing time for information to stabilize and take root.

  2. Nothing discourages mastery more than an adult who steps in and says: “Let me do that for you.”

How often do we spend two days on a concept and move forward to the next before students have time to digest the new material?  They are left in a state of confusion trying to make connections between the multiple concepts which can lead to anxiety.  How many times do we show students a procedure or process and in the end, it is only us who has the understanding of the concept?  Building resilience screams SMP 1, SMP 2 and SMP 3, which makes yet another argument of why the Standards for Mathematical Practice should be in the forefront of your teaching.

Lisa Bejarano’s post has stoked a fire I’ve had burning inside me for a while.  Perfect timing as I’m heading back to school after a week’s break.  I’m going in armed with strategies and information which will help me meet the needs of the students I will encounter.

Written by Jenise Sexton (@MrsJeniseSexton)

What’s Your Elevator Pitch to the Federal Government?
 

Tracy Zager posted a fascinating exchange she had with a potential congressman:

 

 

It’s not often that you get a politician genuinely asking “What should we be doing?” So what’s your elevator pitch to the federal government? What should the US Congress (or any country’s legislature) do to improve teaching and learning in our schools?

Join the conversation on Twitter. The thread starts here.

Written by Kent Haines (@MrAKHaines)

Some GeoGebra Love

I’ve been writing a lot lately about Desmos and the activity builder, and some folks have been under the impression that I have therefore lost my love for GeoGebra. As if! As I sit at this desk, I have a digital pile of gorgeous student-created GeoGebras to give feedback on, so believe me, I’m still a GeoGeholic. This week I’m writing about some great GeoGebra posts I found using #ggbchat. Here’s one by Neil Dickson (@GeoGebrain) about using it to introduce trigonometry.  I particularly loved how Neil combined the hi-tech with those old trig tables.  Jenny Krzystowczyk’s post (@jennyktechin) is about combining Google drive with GeoGebra to create an isosceles triangle lesson that engaged her students. The post that keeps pinging in my brain, however, is this one by Daniel Pearcy (@DanielPearcy) about the need to talk about good pedagogy when we talk about GGB, or any edtech tool.  He includes a link to a series of videos on that subject, based on his own presentation. I’m currently working my way through them, looking forward especially to “GeoGebra Pedagogy Part 5: Student-Centred Tasks”.  And I love that he made these videos for people who couldn’t be there in person!

Written by Audrey McLaren (@a_mcsquared)

Global Math Department Needs Your Help!

The Global Math Department is looking for individuals who are interested in planning the Tuesday night webinars hosted on Big Marker. GMD bookers contact potential speakers regarding speaking opportunities, and provide them with details on planning sessions. If you are interested in being more involved with the Global Math Department, contact Heather at heather.m.kohn@gmail.com or Dylan at dkane47@gmail.com.

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